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Kayaking

The Old Town Predator XL kayak

Sometimes you feel like a paddle; sometimes you don't. The new modular Predator XL kayak from Old Town keeps you happy in either case. With the help of a drop-in electric motor module, you can leave the paddle onshore and navigate the water with 45 lb (20.4 kg) of thrust and a foot-controlled rudder system.  Read More

The CruiserBoard can be paddled from a sitting or standing position

As popular and fast-growing a sport as stand-up paddleboarding has been, sometimes you just need to sit down and take a load off. A cross between a kayak and paddleboard, the CruiserBoard is a sit-down, stand-up paddleboard that gives paddlers more versatility than ever.  Read More

RiF010 project will transform Rotterdam's Steigersgracht Canal into a surfing spot

Though Rotterdam isn't generally associated with surfing, a new aquatic attraction due to be completed in June 2015 could well change that. Set to be located in the city's Steigersgracht Canal, the RiF010 project will feature a wave pool that boasts a 1.5 m (4.9 ft) high wave every 7.5 seconds, in addition to other water-related activities.  Read More

The Solo Shuttle Trailer lets you tow your kayak behind your bike, then mount your bike on...

Kayaking down rivers is definitely a fun experience, with new scenery constantly presenting itself at every turn. It does offer one logistical challenge, though – you have to leave one vehicle at your take-out point before you start, then take another vehicle (with your kayak on it) upriver to the put-in. That, or you have to arrange for someone to pick you up. Either way, it's not a one-person activity. Ohio-based inventor Jerry Allen, however, has created a possible solution. His Solo Shuttle Trailer lets you tow your kayak behind your bicycle to get to the put-in, then bring your bike along for the trip to the take-out.  Read More

Jim Smith on the water in his 3D-printed kayak

It doesn't seem too long ago that 3D-printers were astounding us by churning out cheeky little trinkets or small replacement parts. But the technology has quickly grown to cater for everything from rapid prototyping to slick-looking commercial products, and a quick snack for astronauts to bizarre models of unborn babies. Jim Smith of Grass Roots Engineering has been designing and building his own home-based, large-scale 3D printer since 2008, and the latest modification recently spent over 40 days producing 28 colorful ABS plastic sections that were bolted together to create a 16.7 ft-long kayak.  Read More

The position of the XS-1's outriggers can be adjusted on the water

Kayaking is a fast, easy and fun way of paddling across the water. That said, some people worry that the perceived tippiness of the boats makes it too easy a way of ending up in the water, too. That's why you sometimes see kayaks with stabilizing outriggers ... although those outriggers can get in the way. The TriKayak XS-1 is designed to offer the stability, without the hassle.  Read More

Kayak Power Meter

Paddling a kayak is tough work. If you're wondering just how tough, a new paddle from New Zealand-based One Giant Leap can tell you. Its integrated power meter monitors how much power is going into each stroke.  Read More

A new type of paddling

Stand-up paddleboarding has been one of the fastest growing outdoor sports in recent years. It's been growing so fast that even general interest publications like Time Magazine and The Wall Street Journal have taken notice. New start-up outfit Nocqua believes it has a way to make paddleboarding even more fun and popular, empowering paddlers to get out in the dead of night.  Read More

The DFP (Dive-Fish-Paddle) kayak, with its pontoons extended

Compared to human-powered watercraft such as canoes or rowboats, kayaks are certainly fast, plus they’re easy to paddle. Should you try to stand up and fish or scuba dive from one, however, it’s quite likely to capsize. With that in mind, California-based TrueRec has designed the DFP (Dive-Fish-Paddle) sit-on-top kayak. It features spring-loaded pontoons that fold out to the sides and lock in place for added stability when stopped, but that otherwise stay tucked in and out of the way.  Read More

The Kayak 1 – if you have to ask, you can't afford it

Rich folks ... they have their immaculately-appointed yachts and classic wooden motor launches, but they pretty much have to use the same sit-on-top kayaks as the rest of us, right? Not if the Kayak 1 has anything to say about it.  Read More

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