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Johns Hopkins University


— Good Thinking

Glass-based paint keeps things cool by reflecting sunlight

By - August 17, 2015 1 Picture

Whether it’s slides at playgrounds or roofs of houses, there are some things that you just don’t want to heat up in the sun. Not only does it make them uncomfortable to touch, but it also causes them to age prematurely. While painting such surfaces white is one approach, a scientist at Johns Hopkins University has developed another – reflective paint made from glass.

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— Drones

Study successfully uses drones to transport blood samples

By - July 30, 2015 2 Pictures

We’ve already heard about drones being used to deliver pharmaceuticals to patients in remote locations, but scientists from Johns Hopkins University and Uganda’s Makerere University are now looking at the other end of the picture – using them to deliver remotely-located patients’ blood samples to labs in larger centers. According to a proof-of-concept study conducted by the researchers, the little unmanned aircraft should be able to do the job just fine.

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— Health and Wellbeing

Student-designed pill dispenser uses fingerprint scanner to avoid overdosing

By - June 29, 2015 1 Picture

And you thought that regular pill bottles were hard to open ... a new overdose-proof medication dispenser developed by a team of mechanical engineering students at Johns Hopkins University can't be opened even with the help of a hammer or drill. It does, however, deliver the proper dosage at the proper time, as long as the patient uses its built-in fingerprint scanner.

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— Medical

Newly identified protein may hold key to preventing diabetes-induced blindness

By - May 25, 2015 1 Picture

Diabetic retinopathy is one of a number of nasty effects diabetes can have on the human body. The disease sees the development of leaky blood vessels in the eye that over time lead to permanent loss of vision. Though it is the leading cause of new cases of blindness in American adults, its progress can be slowed by certain drugs or laser treatment. But research has now uncovered a new protein found to drive the condition, raising the possibility of preventing it altogether.

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— Medical

MRI-based cancer detection technique could replace biopsies

By - March 30, 2015 2 Pictures
While non-invasive imaging technologies, such as mammograms or CT scans, are capable of detecting tumors, identifying whether they are malignant or benign usually involves getting out the scalpel and conducting a biopsy. Now researchers at Johns Hopkins University have developed a technique that uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to noninvasively detect cancerous cells, offering the potential of supplementing biopsies or maybe one day replacing them altogether. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

New study finds e-cig vapor contains same free radicals found in cigarette smoke

By - February 11, 2015 1 Picture
Many people assume e-cigarettes are a healthier – or less unhealthy, at least – option than regular cigarettes, resulting in a rapid uptake in recent years. While the long-term effects of e-cigarettes are still unknown, research out of Johns Hopkins University has found that e-cigs may deliver a false sense of security along with their nicotine hit. Read More
— Space

MESSENGER uses helium for last minute reprieve

By - December 28, 2014 1 Picture
Now orbiting the planet Mercury after over ten years in space, NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft is still functioning better than expected. Its mission will soon come to an end though – it's running out of fuel and is scheduled to crash into the planet in March. However, mission control have come up with a novel plan that will use the helium used to pressurize the unmanned probe's engine to give it another month of life. Read More
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