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Invisible

A prototype of the 'stealth' blade developed by QinetiQ and Vestas is fitted onto a Vestas...

Plans for the installation of wind farms the world over are being delayed or abandoned due to objections from the aviation community or air defense interests. The problem is that when it comes to low flying aircraft or wind turbines, conventional radar has a bit of an identity crisis - not being able to tell the difference. Recent tests in the UK of "stealth" turbine technology could provide a solution.  Read More

The structure of the invisible electromagnetic gateway is comprised of two perfect electri...

Harnessing the unique properties of metamaterials, researchers in China have recently published a work detailing the implementation of a thin air, broadband and remotely controllable 'invisible gateway' that is able to shield all types of electromagnetic waves while letting through all other physical objects.  Read More

With active cloaking, three devices placed around an object neutralize and later rebuild t...

Mathematicians at the University of Utah have recently announced they have elaborated an innovative way to shield two-dimensional objects from all types of waves, from electromagnetic to those caused by natural events like earthquakes and tsunamis, leading the way to a completely new approach to achieving invisibility.  Read More

The camera, flash and color swatches

As technology becomes available to help those wishing to avoid the annoying flash photography of the paparazzi get some payback, researchers Dilip Krishnan and Rob Fergus from New York University have developed a system for taking dazzle-free photos in poor lighting conditions which could result in celebs not even knowing they're being photographed. Named dark light flash photography by its creators, the system uses light waves beyond our visible range and special software and algorithms to produce photos comparable in quality to a long exposure shot.  Read More

Harry Potter and his cloak of invisibility - which you can't see obviously

Invisibility has been a staple of science fiction, (and my own personal fantasies), for decades and in recent years we’ve watched as fiction edges ever closer to reality through the use of metamaterials. The problem with most of the devices currently being researched however, is that since they totally encompass the object being rendered invisible, they are also rendered blind as well, which kind of defeats the purpose. But a team from Hong Kong’s University of Science and Technology believes they have come up with an answer to this problem and that it is indeed possible to create a cloaking device that would be able to render an object invisible without encompassing it.  Read More

June 16, 2008 Research into the cloaking properties of “left handed” metamaterials is continuing, with the latest news coming from scientists at the Polytechnic University of Valencia who have proven that these man-made substance can make objects impervious to sound waves. A proposed "acoustic cloak" would use sonic crystals, a class of metamaterial, to bend sound waves around an object, and could be used to render vessels Sonar-invisible... perhaps even bring to life that staple of spy technology: the Cone of Silence.  Read More

Thales UK's optronic mast

Thales UK's optronic mast is a non-hull breaching substitute for a periscope, which rapidly captures a 360 degree scan and sends the image to the console screens in a sub’s operation center. The electro-optics system provides improved surface visibility, while allowing the ship to remain hidden from sonar detection.  Read More

Stealth ships: HMS Helsingborg and HMS Visby.
 Photo: Peter Nilsson/Kockums AB

March 2, 2008 Like a lot of emerging science, the study of metamaterials is both amazingly cool and nearly impossible to understand without an advanced degree in physics or a long night on Wikipedia. It’s made Gizmag headlines before, with researchers claiming its unique structure, which has a negative refractive index, could be used to render objects invisible to the naked eye. Now scientists at Britannia Royal Navy College are working on a plan to use it to create the ultimate stealth vessel, according to a report in this month's edition of Physics World.  Read More

FlatWire Ready offers invisible power

June 1, 2007 With wireless technologies being incorporated into many new products, the scope for interior designers to create a new and uncluttered look has never been greater – and we suspect it will be some time yet until we have commercially available wireless power. Which is why we’re so bullish on this product. Since its first patents were filed in 1995, FlatWire Ready technology has been winning awards and converts for its unique approach to electrical wiring. The technology is now available for low voltage lighting, audio, video, voice and data and considerable attention has been paid to the development of installation accessories that make it easy for even a novice DIYer to install in minutes in four easy steps - Map it, Stick It, Click It, and Make it Disappear.  Read More

The Miro 3 High-Speed Digital Camera  - making the invisible visible

May 11, 2007 Vision Research showed off a very special new camera at the recent NAB in Las Vegas, and SAE World Congress in Detroit - the first in a new line of Phantom high-speed digital cameras. The Phantom Miro line is a compact, light-weight, rugged family of cameras targeted at industrial applications ranging from biometric research to automotive crash testing. Rated to survive 100g acceleration this rugged camera can take 512x512 images at up to 2200 frames-per-second (fps). Reduce the resolution to 32 x 32 and achieve frame rates greater than 95,000 fps. With an ISO rating of 4800 (monochrome, saturation-based ISO 12232), the camera has the light sensitivity for the most demanding applications. With shutter speeds as low as 2 microseconds, the user can freeze objects in motion, eliminate blur, and bring out the image detail needed for successful motion analysis. The camera accepts any standard 1" C-mount lens. See a movie of what it can do here.  Read More

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