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Internet

— Science

New startup uses Internet to predict the future

By - August 3, 2010 4 Pictures
There’s no doubt that most people would like to know the future. It’s a desire that has kept palm readers, astrologists and tea-leaf readers in business for hundreds of years. Now there’s a company called Recorded Future that says it can use information scoured from tens of thousands of websites, blogs and Twitter accounts to predict the future. And before you laugh, it’s got some heavyweight backers including Google and the CIA. Read More
— Computers

Internet gets security upgrade

By - July 31, 2010 1 Picture
The organization that oversees the Internet's unique identifier naming system has joined forces with the U.S. Department of Commerce and secure infrastructure specialist Verisign Inc. to try and make our online lives a little safer. The Internet Corporation For Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) has revealed that a solution has been found to a flaw in the security of the domain name system. The collaboration has announced the deployment of a new security extension to make sure that our website addressing requests are not hijacked by dishonest types looking to steal our savings. Read More
— Good Thinking

The Humane Reader uses 8-bit technology to bring Wikipedia to developing countries

By - July 29, 2010 3 Pictures
When you search for just about anything on the Internet, it seems like a Wikipedia entry on that subject is almost always amongst the top ten hits. Despite rumors of dissent within its ranks, the encyclopedic website is one of the largest single repositories of knowledge in the world. So, with that in mind, what do you do if you want to bring a significant portion of the information on the Internet to people who can’t afford net access? You load a searchable offline version of Wikipedia onto a US$20 8-bit computer, that they can watch through their TVs. That’s what computer consultant Braddock Gaskill has done with his Humane Reader, which he hopes will find a place in homes, schools and libraries in developing nations. Read More
— Digital Cameras Feature

HP sees the future of printing in the cloud

Printers are one of the less exciting PC peripherals going around, yet they are one device that most PC users own. While the “paperless office” was predicted as far back as the mid 70’s history has shown the reverse to be true, with PC’s making it easier than ever to produce hard copies of documents. In my (thankfully brief) time working in IT support for a medium-sized business, printer problems were by far the most common reason for calls for help and of these calls, printer drivers were often the culprit. Anyone who has had to set up a printer has likely also encountered problems with sourcing the right driver for the right system. In developing new web connected and cloud aware printers Hewlett Packard believes it has hit upon a solution that could see an end to driver hassles and give printers much wider functionality, including making printing from mobile devices such as smartphones possible without the need for a PC at all. HP has seen the future of printing and is convinced it lies in the cloud. Read More
— Telecommunications

Wi-Fi and 3G could become competitors for mobile Internet access

By - June 22, 2010 1 Picture
Accessing the Internet while away from the home or office has never been easier. When there’s no Wi-Fi available users can jump on 3G broadband to get their online fix. And that’s the way it has generally been, with the two main mobile communications technologies acting as complementary services. But with the advent of Wi-Fi based municipal wireless networks some experts say there is a strong possibility that Wi-Fi will compete with the 3G cell phone network in city areas and perhaps even become a substitute. Read More
— Telecommunications

Universal 4Mbps broadband comes with a US$23.5 billion price tag

By - May 12, 2010 1 Picture
The developed world is fast heading towards a globally networked information economy. Any government that fails to recognize that high-speed Internet access is fundamental to future economic growth and prosperity runs the risk of quickly ending up on the wrong end of a digital divide. While this applies to countries as a whole it also apples to residents within a country, with some spoiled for choice when it comes to broadband access while others in more remotes areas are left wanting. In a bid to ensure broadband access to all people in the U.S., the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has set a 4Mbps download target for universal broadband with its National Broadband Plan. The undertaking will cost US$23.5 billion. Read More
— Telecommunications

Transmission speeds of 100Mbps over 1km on existing copper networks

By - April 22, 2010 1 Picture
In an ideal world we would all access the Internet over fiber optic cables that reach right up to the front door to deliver blisteringly fast transmission speeds. Unfortunately, we don’t live in an ideal world and many of us are forced to rely on aging copper network infrastructure. Now, Alcatel-Lucent’s Bell Labs has demonstrated technology that boosts the transmission speeds over two copper pairs to 100Mbps over a distance of 1km. This could see such infrastructure given a new lease of life, satisfying consumer’s need for speed for some time to come. Read More
— Computers

Hillcrest Labs launch Kylo – the TV-friendly browser

By - March 23, 2010 8 Pictures
The ease with which computers can be hooked up to a HDTV has seen many people doing just that - whether it be to enjoy media stored on a PC or to surf the web while kicking back on the couch. Doing the latter can often be less than ideal, however, with input devices that can be difficult to use while reclining and browsers that have been designed specifically for up close and personal use on a computer screen. Last year Hillcrest Labs released its Loop pointer to tackle the first problem, and have now unveiled the Kylo web browser to address the second. Read More
— Automotive

Entertainment on the Moov with the Mio V780

By - March 2, 2010 4 Pictures
Portable navigation company Mio has announced a new product at CeBIT 2010 which is set to further blur the boundaries between GPS navigation, entertainment and Internet devices - the Mio Moov V780. Not only will users be able to find their way around but with the flick of a finger they'll be able to scroll through photos, watch high definition videos or play their favorite music. There's even the option to view digital TV thanks to an integrated receiver. Read More
— Digital Cameras

scenechronize - film production gets web-based

By - February 25, 2010 10 Pictures
If you’ve ever worked on a major film project, you’ll know just how complex all phases of the production can be - scripts and schedules get faxed and/or emailed back and forth, a bazillion phone calls and messages are made and left, and then whenever anything goes wrong (which is usually about once every 15 minutes) everything needs to be rejigged, and everyone needs to be notified of the changes. If only there were some way of posting that information where all the cast and crew could see it, people could make changes to it, and then everyone would be made aware of those changes. Gee, anything come to mind? Yes, it’s a new application for our friend, The Internet. scenechronize is its name, and it promises to save filmmakers a ton of confusion, frustration, time, money and paper. Read More
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