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Interactive


— Science

Meta.Morf showcases works at the intersection of art and technology

Trondheim in Norway is set to become the stage for some of the most cutting-edge experiments by artists who have turned their focus to the implications of science and technology. Called Meta.Morf – Lost in Transition, the biennale for art and technology is spread across a 30-day program throughout May and includes the work of more than 70 international artists, architects, musicians, writers and researchers from 15 countries. Read More
— Electronics

Video: Gizmag visits "the most digitally advanced retail experience in the world"

Every year, IBM releases a list of tech trends that it predicts will have a major affect on our lives over the next five years. In its most recent list, the company made the rather surprising prediction that physical retail shops will become much more popular than internet-based stores. They'll do so utilizing technologies that offer customers a more immersive, interactive shopping experience than they could get simply sitting at their computer. Canada's FGL Sports must be eager to usher in that new age of shopping, as it just opened what it describes as "the most digitally advanced and personalized retail experience in the world." That experience takes the form of the new 80,000 sq ft (7,432 sq m) SportChek sporting goods store, located in Edmonton, Alberta's West Edmonton Mall. Read More
— Games

Guitar Hero creators shift focus to "exergaming" with Goji Play

Hoping to build on their success in bringing a marriage of physical movement and arcade action to the mainstream with Guitar Hero, RedOctane co-founders Kai and Charles Huang have formed Blue Goji and are looking to gain a foothold in the rapidly-evolving world of exercise-gaming. Their latest effort, Goji Play, uses two wireless controllers and an activity sensor to turn a regular cardio machine into a makeshift video game platform. Read More
— 3D Printing

Artist creates 3D-printed voice sculpture of Obama's speech

It seems there's little that you can't create with 3D printing; we've recently seen lingerie, guns, rocket engines, musical instruments and even rooms. French artist Gilles Azzaro, however, uses the technology to capture something much more abstract. His 3D-printed sculptures of voice recordings resemble alien landscapes, with high and low tones represented as peaks and troughs. Instead of only hearing the rich tones of Barack Obama's State of the Union speech, you can see them too, in Azzaro's latest sculpture entitled "Next Industrial Revolution." Read More
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