Purchasing new hardware? Read our latest product comparisons
ADVERTISEMENT

Interactive

Cigarette butts are a major source of litter, certainly rivaling chewing gum as a menace on public streets. This problem is being tackled in some countries by fines being issued to the culprits, but that only helps the situation if someone is caught in the act and then learns from their mistake – which isn't guaranteed. Dutch/Turkish design company Ioglo thinks it has a better solution in the form of Fumo, which uses an audiovisual show to reward smokers for their cigarette butts. Read More
It's one thing to assemble a loudspeaker from 3D-printed components, but researchers at Disney have figured out a way to 3D print interactive loudspeakers in any shape imaginable, while also integrating speaker functionality into the whole object or just parts of it. Just envision 3D printing an entire loudspeaker in one step in the shape of Cinderella, and having sounds boom off her whole body or just her skirt. Read More
Trondheim in Norway is set to become the stage for some of the most cutting-edge experiments by artists who have turned their focus to the implications of science and technology. Called Meta.Morf – Lost in Transition, the biennale for art and technology is spread across a 30-day program throughout May and includes the work of more than 70 international artists, architects, musicians, writers and researchers from 15 countries. Read More
NASA, using images taken from its Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) has released a 680-gigapixel interactive mosaic of the Moon's north polar region. The resolution of the image is one pixel to 6.5 ft (2 m) with the area imaged being the equivalent of slightly more than the land mass of the states of Alaska and Texas combined. Read More
Every year, IBM releases a list of tech trends that it predicts will have a major affect on our lives over the next five years. In its most recent list, the company made the rather surprising prediction that physical retail shops will become much more popular than internet-based stores. They'll do so utilizing technologies that offer customers a more immersive, interactive shopping experience than they could get simply sitting at their computer. Canada's FGL Sports must be eager to usher in that new age of shopping, as it just opened what it describes as "the most digitally advanced and personalized retail experience in the world." That experience takes the form of the new 80,000 sq ft (7,432 sq m) SportChek sporting goods store, located in Edmonton, Alberta's West Edmonton Mall. Read More

As part of the Singapore Biennale 2013, a group of artists has created a maze filled with life-sized, three-dimensional, dancing holograms of people and animals, capable of reacting to a person's presence. Read More

Hoping to build on their success in bringing a marriage of physical movement and arcade action to the mainstream with Guitar Hero, RedOctane co-founders Kai and Charles Huang have formed Blue Goji and are looking to gain a foothold in the rapidly-evolving world of exercise-gaming. Their latest effort, Goji Play, uses two wireless controllers and an activity sensor to turn a regular cardio machine into a makeshift video game platform. Read More
It seems there's little that you can't create with 3D printing; we've recently seen lingerie, guns, rocket engines, musical instruments and even rooms. French artist Gilles Azzaro, however, uses the technology to capture something much more abstract. His 3D-printed sculptures of voice recordings resemble alien landscapes, with high and low tones represented as peaks and troughs. Instead of only hearing the rich tones of Barack Obama's State of the Union speech, you can see them too, in Azzaro's latest sculpture entitled "Next Industrial Revolution." Read More

In the end, the ultimate goal of advertising is to get customers to remember and ultimately purchase a product or service. However, the simple goal doesn't mean the journey to it can't be a little more creative. British Airways is taking this to heart with its new billboard that actually identifies its planes as they fly over it. Read More

Wouldn't it be great if we had robotic garbage cans that could move around on their own and pick up litter? Well, engineers from the Interaction and Communications Design Lab at Japan's Toyohashi University of Technology are part-way there. Their bots, however, ask people to pick up the trash for them. Read More
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT