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Interactive

— Music

Orange makes music theory learning more engaging with Musicboard

By - January 21, 2015 2 Pictures
As students of music will doubtless agree, music theory can be a bit, well, dry. It's certainly not as memorable or interesting as getting to grips with an actual instrument, but it is rewarding. The education wing of instrument amplification titan Orange Amps has announced what's billed as the first truly interactive music theory teaching tool in the world. The Orange Musicboard has been designed to engage students both visually and aurally, and is set to make music theory class rock. Read More
— Bicycles

ebove interactive mountain bike trainer aims to bring the trails indoors

By - January 19, 2015 3 Pictures
Now that much of the Northern Hemisphere is well within the icy clutches of winter, many mountain bikers have turned to riding indoors on rollers or trainers. While that may help them to keep fit, it's still far less fun or interesting than riding outdoors on actual trails. Norwegian startup Activetainment hopes to close that gap a little, however, with its interactive ebove B/01 bike. The trainer moves beneath the rider and becomes easier or more difficult to pedal, in response to the terrain of animated trails on an accompanying tablet. Read More
— Electronics

NavVis performs Google-like 3D mapping, but quicker

By - October 17, 2014 5 Pictures
When we first heard about the NavVis system a couple of years ago, it was being developed for indoor navigation. Developed by researchers at the Technical University of Munich, it utilizes maps consisting of location-tagged photos of the hallways of buildings. In order to figure out where they are, users just take a photo of their surroundings using their smartphone, then the NavVis app matches that photo up with one in its map. Now, the technology has been expanded to the point that it could give Google Street View a run for its money. Read More
— Electronics

Leia Display System: The mid-air touchscreen you can control with your whole body

By - October 9, 2014 27 Pictures
The recently-unveiled Leia Display System (LDS) is a lot like a large touchscreen – but with one important difference: its screen is not solid, but rather made from mist. This means you can walk right through the screen, manipulate displayed images using hand gestures reminiscent of Minority Report, or even interact with the display using your whole body. Read More
— Games

RoomAlive transforms your living room into an interactive video game

By - October 9, 2014 10 Pictures
Microsoft Research has moved on from IllumiRoom, its concept for adding visuals to the periphery of gamers' television sets. After concluding that that system -- which used a Kinect camera and a projector to bring video games into the living room -- was too expensive to be released commercially, the company has revealed RoomAlive, which is even more expensive and even less practical. Thankfully, it's also an intriguing glimpse at the possible future of gaming. Read More
— Electronics

"Combining glass" brings together real and virtual in augmented reality reflections

By - October 8, 2014 3 Pictures
Perhaps you've been in a situation where you noticed that your reflection in a window looked like it was actually standing amongst the items that were visible through that window. Now, scientists at the University of Bristol have taken that phenomenon and incorporated it into an experimental new interactive display. Among other things, it lets users select objects seen through a pane of glass, using the reflection of their finger on that glass. Read More

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