Advertisement

Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology

Health & Wellbeing

IBM-developed macromolecule uses triple-attack technique to fight deadly viruses

Viral infections can be difficult to tackle due to their ability to rapidly develop resistance to drugs, and major viruses like Ebola and Zika pose a real threat to global health. Help might well be at hand though, with researchers from the Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology in Singapore, working alongside scientists from IBM Research, developing a breakthrough macromolecule that tackles viruses in three separate ways.Read More

Medical

Green tea nanocarrier delivers cancer-killing drugs more effectively

Many of us drink green tea for its wonderful health benefits, including proven antioxidant, antimicrobial, anti-aging and anti-cancer properties. Now, researchers in Singapore have taken its cancer-fighting properties to the next level, developing a green tea-based nanocarrier that encapsulates cancer-killing drugs. It is the first time green tea has been used to deliver drugs to cancer cells, with promising results. Animal studies show far more effective tumor reduction than use of the drug alone while significantly reducing the accumulation of drugs in other organs.Read More

Medical

Peptide-based nanogel accelerates healing of burn wounds

Because second- and third-degree burns damage underlying layers of skin, they can take a long time to heal. Such extended healing periods are not only painful to the patient, but increase the risk of infection and scarring. While various medications are available to deal with pain and infection, there is currently no commercial treatment to speed up the rate of healing of burn wounds. Now researchers have developed a nanogel that could fill this hole.Read More

Science

Anti-microbial hydrogel offers new weapon against drug-resistant bacteria

Whether it’s in hospitals, restaurant kitchens or our homes, harmful bacteria such as E.coli are a constant concern. Making matters worse is the fact that such bacteria are increasingly developing a resistance to antibiotics. This has led to a number of research projects, which have utilized things such as blue light, cold plasma and ozone to kill germs. One of the latest non-antibiotic bacteria-slayers is a hydrogel developed by IBM Research and the Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology in Singapore.Read More

    Advertisement
    Advertisement
    Advertisement

    See the stories that matter in your inbox every morning