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Input Device

— Computers Review

Review: Logitech MX Anywhere 2 does multi-device mousing right

Despite the rise of touchscreens, for many people the humble mouse remains the primary computing input device, requiring the right amount of comfort and precision for the user. Just as with tools in the garage or utensils in the kitchen, quality makes a big difference on overall experience. We give the Logitech MX Anywhere 2 mouse a spin, click, and scroll to see how it handles.

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— Mobile Technology

Phree smartpen digitizes your doodles, no matter where you draw them

Devices like Smart Kapp and Livescribe's extensive line of clever pens are just some of the ways you can stream your scribbles to digital displays in real time. The thing is, though, they also require that you to write on certain purpose-built materials like whiteboards, dotted paper or even microwaveable notebooks. Looking to break free of these limitations is Israeli startup OTM Technologies – its Phree Bluetooth smartpen shoots a laser beam from its tip to allow you to write on just about any surface you like.

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— Electronics

Rocketbook digitizes your notes, just microwave it to start over

With touchscreens and keyboards never far from our fingertips these days, paper notebooks might not be as essential as they once were. But there's still something pleasant, if not always convenient, about putting pen to paper. The latest book to join a growing library of digitally inspired writing platforms is Rocketbook, and it does so with an interesting twist. In addition to shooting handwritten notes and doodles to the cloud, when it fills up users can stick the book in the microwave to wipe its pages clean. Read More
— Smartwatches

iSkin stickers could be used to control mobile devices

While a wrist-worn smartwatch may be easier to access than a smartphone that has to be retrieved from a pocket, the things certainly have tiny screens. That could make them rather difficult to use for certain tasks, particularly ones where a larger interface area is needed. Well, that's where iSkin comes in. The experimental system allows users to control mobile devices using flexible, stretchable stickers that adhere to their skin. Read More
— Mobile Technology

TextBlade portable keyboard is greater than the sum of its parts

We've looked at various folding portable keyboards designed to make it easy for those that like some tactile feedback when entering text on mobile devices. But California-based WayTools has taken a different approach with the TextBlade keyboard, which it claims is the "most compact touch-type machine ever produced" and literally pulls apart to fit in a pocket. Read More
— Computers

Dexmo exoskeleton-for-the-hand gives computer interfacing the finger(s)

What happens when you're immersed in a virtual world – such as a game – and you want to use your real-world fingers to control your virtual fingers in that world? Well, we've already seen a number of sensor-equipped gloves, but China's Dexta Robotics is taking what it claims is a more cost-effective approach. Its Dexmo is an exoskeleton for your hand, which can even provide the user with a limited sense of touch. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

Fove head mounted display expands possibilities with eye-tracking technology

Back in 2011, Google filed a patent for an unlock system for Google Glass that would use eye-tracking technology. Tokyo-based startup Fove believes the combination of a head mounted display (HMD) and eye-tracking technology has far wider applications and is working on just such a device aimed at the consumer market. Microsoft apparently agrees, having accepted the company into its Ventures Accelerator in London earlier this month. Read More