Highlights from the 2014 LA Auto Show

Injuries

An eTriage armband, that transmits a patient's location and condition

When emergency response crews have to deal with many casualties at once, such as at a disaster site, one of the first things they do is set up a triage system. This involves assessing the severity of each patient's injuries, so that the people who need help most urgently get it first. It's a system that works, but the EU-funded BRIDGE project is trying to make it better. The project partners are developing a new high-tech triage, that incorporates GPS and RFID technology.  Read More

BIUS1 pedals can move in and out or twist laterally, in order to accommodate the rider's l...

When we walk or run, our feet are able to land on the ground in whatever orientation makes life easiest for our hips, knees and ankles. When we're on a bike, however, our feet are at least somewhat held in place against the pedals. This can damage our leg joints, if they're forced to move in a stressful fashion. Germany's BioConform is now offering what it claims is a solution, in the form of its adaptable BIUS1 pedals.  Read More

A high-tech running shoe being developed by Fraunhofer has the ability to evaluate a jogge...

Given its accessibility to anyone with two feet, jogging is one of the most popular forms of fitness activity around the world, with around 10 million people in Germany alone donning their running shoes and hitting the pavement on a regular basis, according to the Fraunhofer Institute for Photonic Microsystems (IPMS). However, this popularity also translates into a large number of jogging-related injuries. In an effort to reduce the number of injuries, a research team from IPMS is developing a high-tech running shoe with the ability to evaluate a jogger's running form and technique in real-time.  Read More

A special polymer material created by UCLA professor Vijay Gupta has been found to reduce ...

One of the most feared football-related injuries is concussion. With the new NFL and NCAA college seasons just about to kick off, fans will be praying that none of their team suffers any serious impact collisions that could end their season or result in memory loss or depression later in life. University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) biomechanical engineering professor, Vijay Gupta, is testing a special polymer material that when applied to the inside of helmets, can reduce G-force impact by 25 percent.  Read More

The VEPS sensor can detect signs of traumatic brain injury (TBI) that can result from blow...

Victims of penetrating head injuries usually seek immediate attention, as the hole in their skull is difficult to miss. However, people with closed-head injuries may show few immediate signs of the trauma, and appropriate diagnostic equipment (primarily a CAT scanner) is often not immediately available. A Mexican-US team of researchers has now developed a simple, easy to operate, and inexpensive electromagnetic sensor for traumatic brain injuries, suited to on site use by field personnel and paramedics.  Read More

This CheckLight's blinking red LED indicates that a serious blow to the head has taken pla...

Although everyone knows of the dangers of brain injuries, it’s often difficult to tell if such an injury has taken place. There are certainly cases in which athletes receive concussions, yet say that they feel fine when asked. That’s why Reebok and flexible electronics developer MC10 have created the CheckLight skull cap. It lets athletes and coaches know when a potentially brain-damaging impact has been delivered to its wearer’s head.  Read More

A material currently in development works in the same fashion as a scab, to accelerate the...

While you may think that standard bandages already serve as sort-of artificial scabs, the fact is that they mainly just compress and protect the wound – a scab, on the other hand, actually helps it heal. Now, however, scientists are working on a wound dressing that promotes healing in the same fashion as a scab.  Read More

A material known as a plasmonic polypeptide nanocomposite has been shown to strengthen las...

Stitches and staples may be on their way to becoming a thing of the past, thanks to a developing technology known as laser tissue welding. Now, a new gold-based solder has been created, that could make tissue welds in regions such as the intestines much stronger and more reliable.  Read More

Harvard's spleen-on-a-chip blood filtration device

The spleen’s job is to filter our blood. When people are critically ill or have received traumatic injuries, however, the spleen alone is sometimes not able to remove enough of the pathogens on its own – potentially-fatal sepsis is the result. In order to help avert such an outcome in those situations, scientists from the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University are developing a device known as the spleen-on-a-chip.  Read More

The FlatEvac (right) allows soldiers to maintain readiness (Photo: Michael Alvarez-Pereyre...

After introducing a hands-free "human backpack", Israeli tactical gear manufacturer Agilite is back with a hands-free solution that allows injured troops to lie flat and be carried to safety. Unlike other stretchers that keep the hands occupied, the FlatEvac sets both hands free. Troops are able to handle their weapons, navigation instruments and other tools while simultaneously carrying their injured battle mate.  Read More

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