Advertisement
more top stories »

Inflatable

— Urban Transport

Giant plug for sealing off subway tunnels in a hurry

By - March 27, 2012 3 Pictures
What’s the best way to plug a giant hole? Why with a giant plug, of course. That’s the thinking of the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate (S&T), which has created just such a giant plug to contain flooding or dangerous gases in mass transit tunnels. Measuring roughly 32 feet (9.7 m) long and with a diameter of 16 feet (4.9 m), the giant plug is an enormous inflatable cylinder that can be filled with air or water in minutes to quickly seal off a section of tunnel in the event of an accident, natural disaster or terrorist attack. Read More
— Sports

One-of-a-kind inflatable snowboard from Signal Snowboards

By - February 29, 2012 8 Pictures
In its Web series "Every Third Thursday," California-based snowboard company Signal Snowboards gets loose and creative in the shop and designs experimental one-offs that push the boundaries of what a snowboard is all about. Last month, the team made a surfboard-snowboard hybrid, and in the most recent installment, they created a snowboard that operates like a bike tire called "Air if you Dare." Read More
— Outdoors

The unique inflatable geodesic "Cave" tent provides stability and room to move

By - December 6, 2011 24 Pictures
Camping can be fun but to be honest, tents are a pain. The romance of carrying your accommodations with you and the excitement of arriving at a new destination can both be swiftly tempered by reality. Erecting your tent using bent aluminum poles, bits of string, damp plastic sheeting and too few pegs becomes old very quickly. Add in pitch darkness and/or rain and the temptation to head for the nearest dodgy hotel can become irresistible. It doesn't have to be that way. Eight years ago two Stefan's from Germany had an idea for a better tent - and now it's here. Time to erect - 1 minute. Read More
— Robotics

Ant-Roach illustrates potential for inflatable robots

By - November 25, 2011 5 Pictures
What weighs a little under 70 pounds, has six legs, and is full of air? No, it's not conjoined monkey triplets with gas - as you've doubtless already gathered from the picture, it's a walking inflatable robot known as Ant-Roach. Earning its name by looking like a cross between an anteater and a cockroach, the wonderfully-kooky beast is the creation of San Francisco-based engineering/design group Otherlab. Besides providing amusement, the device was built to showcase the high strength-to-weight ratios and carrying capacities that are possible with inflatable robots. Read More
— Architecture

The three-ingredient inflatable portable pavilion

This eye-catching pavilion is the result a collaboration between architectural firms Frentes and PAX.RQ, designed for this year's Mobilizarte Design Competition. Architects were given the challenge of creating a mobile cultural space that could be easily assembled, disassembled and transported for five years of use in ten different Brazilian cities. Comprised of three simple elements (scaffolding, prism towers and inflatable membrane) and transportable in two containers, the Mobile Cultural Mobilizarte takes five days to install and features an area size of 1,000 square meters (1,196 sq. yds.), expandable to 3,500 sq.m. (4,186 sq.yds.) – that's nearly as big as a football field. Read More
— Bicycles

Biknd Helium protects your bike with air

By - January 31, 2011 9 Pictures
If you’ve shelled out several thousand dollars for a high-end road or mountain bike, it’s understandable that you might want to bring it with you when you travel to far-away cycling locales. Should you be traveling to compete in a race, it’s pretty much essential that you bring the bike you’ve trained on. It’s also understandable, however, that you might not want to entrust the safety of your precious cargo to a simple cardboard box or giant plastic bag. While several companies offer foam-padded bicycle-shipping cases, Biknd takes a different approach with its Helium case – it uses inflatable air bladders to protect your ride. Read More
— Automotive

Ford introduces inflatable seat belts

By - November 5, 2009 4 Pictures
Most seat belts are designed to stretch during a crash to reduce the force of impact on the wearer while still preventing contact with the interior of the vehicle. Ford has gone one step further with plans to introduce inflatable seat belts designed to reduce the pressure on the chest and help control head and neck motion in rear seat passengers, spreading the crash force across five times more of the occupant’s torso than conventional seat belts. Read More

Subscribe to Gizmag's email newsletter

Advertisement