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Imperial College

— Medical

Imperial College develops cancer-sniffing Intelligent Knife

By - July 19, 2013 1 Picture
Dr. Zoltan Takats of the Imperial College London has developed one very sharp knife – and we're not referring to its keen edge. The Intelligent Knife (iKnife) is equipped with a nose and a brain that can sniff out cancer as it cuts. Using a mass spectrometer to detect chemical profiles associated with tumors, it enables instant identification of cancerous tissue and helps surgeons to make sure that all of a tumor has been removed. Read More
— Science

Take a deep breath – scientists working on a stress breath test

By - March 5, 2013 1 Picture
Most of us are able to let other people know that we’re stressed, simply by telling them. For people such as those suffering from Alzheimer’s, however, it can be difficult to express such a thought. That’s why UK scientists at Loughborough University and Imperial College London are developing a new test that can determine someone’s stress levels by analyzing their breath. Read More
— Science

Vibrating armband used to help athletes develop muscle memory

By - September 6, 2012 1 Picture
“Muscle memory” is the process in which a certain motor task is repeated to such an extent that it can eventually be performed without conscious effort. It comes in handy for all sorts of activities, but is particularly important to athletes – a tennis player can hardly concentrate on the game, for instance, if they’re constantly thinking about how to move their arm every time they return the ball. Now, engineers from Imperial College London have created an armband device known as Ghost, designed to assist athletes in forming optimum muscle memories. Read More
— Science

Room-temperature solid state maser may be the laser of tomorrow

By - August 17, 2012 2 Pictures
Everyone has heard of lasers, but hardly anyone outside of a physics lab or a science fiction novel has heard of a maser. Despite the fact that it was the precursor of the laser, the maser has been something of a technological backwater because masers are difficult to build and expensive to operate. That, however, may be changing. In the August 16 issue of Nature, a team of scientists from Britain’s National Physics Laboratory and Imperial College, London led by Dr. Mark Oxborrow report that they have created the first solid state maser that operates at room temperature, paving the way toward the widespread practical application of the technology. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

Inexpensive device could allow the disabled to control computers with their eyes

By - July 17, 2012 2 Pictures
Bioengineers at Imperial College, London have developed a new computer controller for paraplegics that is not only more accurate and easier to use than current methods, but also uses inexpensive, off-the-shelf components. The GT3D device uses a pair of eyeglass frames with two fast video game console cameras costing less than UKP20 (US$30) each, which scan the wearer’s eyes from outside the field of vision and provide “3D” control at much lower costs and without invasive surgery. Read More
— Sports

Athlete-specific sprint spikes created using 3D printing technology

By - July 3, 2012 1 Picture
With sprinting events at the elite level decided by fractions of a second, athletes are always on the lookout for anything that can provide even the smallest advantage over their rivals. We recently looked at Nike’s Pro TurboSpeed suit that is claimed to cut down a runner’s wind resistance by using golf ball-like dimples, but footwear plays an equally, if not more, important role in an athlete’s performance. Now French engineer and designer Luc Fusaro has employed 3D printing technology to create lightweight sprint shoes that are customized for individual athletes that could prove the difference between winning and losing. Read More
— Music

Winners in sonic experiment prosper and evolve, losers become extinct

By - July 3, 2012 4 Pictures
Researchers from Imperial College London have built a music creation engine where popular sounds are paired and mated with other successful tunes to create new offspring that inherit features from both parents. Audio loops that fail to please become extinct, parents die off and children get the same rating treatment given to their ancestors. Over time, some rather pleasant electronica has formed without so much as one human composer in sight. Read More
— Medical

Research suggests "broken heart syndrome" protects heart from adrenaline overload

By - June 28, 2012 1 Picture
If you haven't heard about takotsubo cardiomyopathy, also known as "broken heart syndrome," you may be surprised to find that one to two percent of people who are initially suspected of having a heart attack are finally discovered to have this increasingly recognized syndrome. New research suggests the condition that temporarily causes heart failure in people who experience severe stress might actually protect the heart from very high levels of adrenaline. Read More
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