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Computers

Microsoft Captionbot will tell you what's in your photos

Scrolling through your Facebook, Twitter or Instagram feed is proof positive that we love taking photos - of our food, our children, our drunken antics and, most of all, ourselves. No matter how good your happy snap, finding a way to caption it can be tricky. It's still early days, but one day you could hand off the responsibility to a Captionbot.Read More

Electronics

This personal cloud stores your photos with easy mobile syncing, AI and facial recognition

When it comes to storing digital photos, looking for one particular image amidst potential tens of thousands can be daunting. A (currently crowdfunding) personal cloud, Monument, may be able to assist casual and professional shutterbugs alike, as it's designed with advanced algorithms that store, organize, and analyze photos and videos for simple, secure access.Read More

Computers

BPG image format offers JPEG quality at half the file size

French programmer Fabrice Bellard has come up with a graphics file format he believes can "replace the JPEG image format." Bellard’s BPG (Better Portable Graphics) format boasts a compelling quality advantage over JPG, particularly when images are heavily compressed. Take a look through the gallery to see a few comparison shots – the left hand side of each image shows the JPEG compressed format, the right side shows BPG at a similar file size.Read More

Telecommunications

Software combines thousands of online images into one that represents them all

If you're trying to find out what the common features of tabby cats are, a Google image search will likely yield more results than you'd ever have the time or inclination to look over. New software created at the University of California, Berkeley, however, is designed to make such quests considerably easier. Known as AverageExplorer, it searches out thousands of images of a given subject, then amalgamates them into one composite "average" image. Read More

Science

Photo editing tool shows viewers what the camera couldn't see

Many people are already annoyed when characters on TV cop shows "zoom in and enhance" on a photo, to reveal a level of detail that could never really have been captured by the camera. Thanks to software developed at Carnegie Mellon University, however, it's now possible to actually turn objects in a photo around ... seemingly revealing sides of them that were facing away from the camera when the picture was taken. Read More

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