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Identification


— Science

Software identifies bat species based on their calls

By - August 8, 2012 1 Picture
Everyone knows that it’s possible to identify different species of birds by their vocalizations, but did you know that it’s also possible to differentiate between different types of bats based on their echolocation calls? Well, now you do. So far, however, there hasn’t been a standardized system of doing so – it’s been left up to individual human listeners to decide on the closest match. That may soon no longer be the case, though, as the new online iBatsID tool comes into use. Read More

Forensic software determines race and gender based on skull measurements

For some time now – whether by using computers or clay – forensic scientists have been able to make three-dimensional reconstructions of the faces of the deceased, based on the contours of their skulls. More recently, however, software has been developed that can determine the sex and precise ancestral background of a person no longer with us, via a set of skull measurements. Read More
— Good Thinking

Japanese palm-reading ATMs to allow card-free transactions

By - April 11, 2012 2 Pictures
Biometric technology has been boosting the security of a greater array of electronic devices in recent years, including homes, businesses, schools and even wallets. The technology has also made its way into ATMs as a way to beat card skimmers, but these machines still require customers to insert a card. Now a Japanese bank has announced that it will introduce ATMs that allow customers to carry out transactions with a scan of their palm. Read More
— Outdoors

VITAband is a cash/I.D. combo you wear on your wrist

By - February 6, 2012 2 Pictures
There’s one thing that everyone should have on their person when they venture off on solo outdoor activities – their I.D. That way, should they end up injured and unable to communicate, first responders will know who they are, and who to contact. While the various cards kept in one’s wallet are a good form of identification, a lot of people don’t want to lug a bulky wallet around in their pocket while doing things like running or rock-climbing. That’s where the VITAband comes in. Not only does the waterproof bracelet provide a link to its wearer’s full Emergency Response Profile, but it also allows them to make cash-free purchases. Read More
— Automotive

Forget face detection - this Japanese car seat can tell who's sitting on it

By - December 27, 2011 3 Pictures
Who needs face detection when your car can know who's sitting in it based on their rear-end? A group of Japanese researchers at the Advanced Institute of Industrial Technology (AIIT) have developed a car seat that can identify drivers while they're sitting down. The way the technology works is pretty simple. The seat is retrofitted with 360 different sensors. Those sensors take into account things like your weight, the highest value of pressure on the seat, and where you come in contact with the seat. The idea is that we all sit in car seats relatively the same way each time, so the seat should be able to tell who is sitting in it, ensuring that the person is the owner of the car rather than a car thief. Read More
— Medical

RumbaTime Go Watch lets you carry medical and payment information on your wrist

By - December 1, 2011 5 Pictures
It's not always convenient to take your wallet with you wherever you go. Times like a morning run or bike ride, it can be easier to leave your cash and ID at home. What happens if you're out on a run and want to stop for a cup of coffee? What if you have a medical emergency or become injured during your trip? RumbaTime's series of GO-enabled watches aim to solve those problems by letting you bring your cash and all your medical information along with you wherever you go in a small colorful watch. Read More
— Sports

New tech tracks and identifies multiple athletes at once

By - November 8, 2011 3 Pictures
Even for diehard sports fanatics, it can sometimes be quite difficult to tell which player is which, when watching a field, court or rink full of team athletes. While this can be merely frustrating for fans, it can have larger ramifications for referees or coaches, whose jobs depend on being able to know which players are doing what, at what time. Scientists from Switzerland’s École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) have devised what could be a solution to that problem – it’s a system that continuously tracks each player, superimposing their number and jersey color over top of their image, on a computer screen. Read More
— Science

Bizarre real time face-substitution system demonstrated

By - September 21, 2011 1 Picture
Some day in the not-too-distant future, you may be on a service like Chatroulette, and suddenly find yourself matched up with a person who looks exactly like Angelina Jolie. Well, chances are it won’t really be her. Instead, it will likely be someone using the descendant of a system put together by Arturo Castro. Using a combination of existing software, the Barcelona digital artist has demonstrated how a variety of famous faces can be mapped onto his own, moving with it in real time. While Castro’s system isn’t likely to fool anyone – in its present version – it’s an unsettling indication of what could be possible with just a little more finessing. Read More
— Science

'Watermark Ink' chip can instantly identify liquids

By - August 4, 2011 2 Pictures
If you want to know exactly what a substance is, your best bet is to use something like a gas chromatographer. The problem is, such machines tend to be large, lab-based and expensive – not the greatest for use in the field, or by people who aren’t connected with a research institute. Researchers from Harvard University's School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, however, have created inexpensive, portable 3D-nanostructured chips, that can instantly identify any liquid via its surface tension. Read More
— Electronics

Electronic tongue identifies different cava wines

By - August 3, 2011 2 Pictures
Spanish efforts to find an electronic alternative to the tried and tested expertise of a human sommelier have now resulted in a system that can tell the difference between varieties of sparkling wine. The new development combines advanced mathematical processing tools with chemical measurement systems and an artificial neural network to create an electronic tongue currently capable of identifying the characteristics of just three cava wines, but with the potential to learn all types available on the market. Read More
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