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Identification

Science

Google Glass-based system identifies you by the sound of your skull

Google Glass may be pretty much dead, but smartglasses in some form are likely to be a part of our future (whether near or distant). When that day comes you don't want just anyone picking up yours and using it without permission. Conventional passwords are one way to go, but scientists from Germany's Saarland University and University of Stuttgart have developed an alternative that doesn't involve having to memorize anything – you do, however, have to let the glasses buzz your skull.Read More

Science

New fingerprinting tech is more than skin-deep

Most fingerprint scanners work the same way – the pad of the finger is pressed against the scanner’s glass surface, light is shone through the glass onto it, and the light that’s reflected back by the minuscule valleys between the print’s ridges is used to create an image of the print. It’s a system that’s usually effective, although it can fail to read prints that have been flattened by age or damaged, plus it can be fooled by gelatine casts of fingerprints. That’s why scientists from the Paris-based Langevin Institute have developed a more reliable scanner, that looks below the skin's surface.Read More

Good Thinking

Glowing fingerprints to highlight criminals

Fingerprinting powders are still the go-to tool for investigators, both real and fictional. However, instead of oils, some fingerprints only leave a residue of amino acids and other compounds that fingerprinting powder doesn't adhere to very well. A new technique developed at Australia's CSIRO not only reveals fingerprints in cases where dusting won't, but makes them glow under UV light.Read More

People identified by their own personal clouds of germs

Do you remember Pig-Pen, the Peanuts comic character who's always surrounded by a cloud of his own filth? Well, it turns out that we're actually all a little like him. Scientists have discovered that not only does everyone emit an invisible "microbial cloud," but that individuals can be recognized by the bacteria that make up their particular cloud.Read More

Mobile Technology

The eyes have it for unlocking ZTE's Grand S3

Unlocking early smartphones was as simple as pushing a couple of buttons, which were conveniently pointed out by the phone itself. Thankfully, as the devices became repositories for more and more personal information, security in the form of passcodes and squiggles, along with voice and fingerprint sensors have become standard. Now eye scans have been added to the list in ZTE's flagship Grand S3 smartphone.Read More

Electronics

Hand-held sensor detects fraudulent fish

According to a study conducted by international non-profit group Oceana, approximately 30 percent of seafood sold in the US is fraudulently mislabeled. That's why scientists at the University of South Florida have created a handheld sensor that can determine if what's being offered is in fact the real thing. Read More

Science

Novel forensic technique identifies people by their hair

If you watch any cop shows, then you know that a person's race and gender can be determined by doing a DNA analysis of one of their hairs. Now, however, Canadian scientists at Queen's University have developed a method of obtaining that same information from hair samples, that's quicker than DNA testing and is 100 percent accurate. Read More

Electronics

MARS prototype puts retinal scanning technology in the palm of a hand

Retinal scans have a lot going for them as a form of identification. You can’t forget your retinas, they're unique, they’re a lot harder to steal than passwords, and Captain Kirk uses them. The problem is, the technology needed to run a reliable retinal scan is often bulky, expensive, and hard to use. Scientists at the Dresden-based Fraunhofer Institute for Photonic Microsystems (IPMS) have shrunk down retinal scanning technology in the hopes of making retinal scans a more widespread identification technology.Read More

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