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Hubble

Space

NASA weighs collosal, ancient galaxy cluster

A team of astronomers has used data collected by a trio of NASA's orbital telescopes in order to weigh an ancient galaxy cluster dating back to 3.8 billion years after the universe was created. Known as IDCS J1426.5+3508 (IDCS 1426), the cluster is the largest structure of its kind ever discovered in this period. Located 10 billion light-years from Earth, it boasts a mass of 500 trillion times that of our Sun – the equivalent of around 1,000 Milky Ways.Read More

Space

Astronomers observe predicted supernova explosion

For the first time, a team of astronomers has successfully made observations of a predicted supernova. The enormous cosmic explosion, nicknamed Refsdal, is believed to have occurred roughly 10 billion years ago, and owes its foreshadowing to a rare astronomical phenomenon known as an Einstein Cross, which led to the recent spotting which took place on Dec. 11th.Read More

Space

New study claims that the vast majority of Earth-like worlds do not yet exist

A newly-published NASA and Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) study is asserting that roughly 92 percent of habitable worlds have yet to be created. The research draws on data collected by NASA's Hubble and Kepler space telescopes, with the aim of placing the creation of Earth, and the potential for advanced life in the greater context of the Universe.Read More

Space

New Hubble release reveals the Veil Nebula in stunning detail

A new image released from the Hubble Space Telescope is granting viewers a stunning view that encapsulates the beauty and complexity of the famous Veil Nebula. The ghostly nebula represents the only evidence of a tumultuous supernova that marked the death of an enormous star with a mass roughly 20 times that of our Sun.
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Space

Pluto's wobbly moons dance to a chaotic tune

Pluto and its largest satellite Charon are an odd pair. The relative size of the Charon means the two act as a double planet system, orbiting a center of gravity located between them in space. A study of data gathered by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has now found that this interaction is having an odd effect on Pluto's smaller moons, causing them to tumble unpredictably with no apparent method to their madness.Read More

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