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Housing

— Architecture

Origami-inspired military shelter said to cut energy use by 70 percent

The ancient art of origami has inspired all kinds of modern technological endeavors, from drones to bridges to batteries and low-cost emergency housing. The latest project to join the fold comes from US-based engineers who have developed a deployable shelter that can be shipped on a standard military pallet, improving the quality of life for soldiers while cutting energy consumption in the process.

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— Architecture

Smart Urban Villages: Efficient and sustainable community living

For most of human history, we've lived in groups a lot larger than our family unit, and reaped considerable benefits from it. Modern urban life, on the other hand, has moved in a different direction; privacy, disconnection, self sufficiency. Eco-village communities are aiming to buck that trend, and to that end Smart Urban Villages is planning to create medium-density, sustainably designed housing communities with optional shared meals, mortgage-free long term leases and pools of shared vehicles to cut down on car ownership costs.

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— Architecture

Shipping containers offer safe, affordable housing in Brighton

Britain has a housing problem. According to homeless charity Crisis, the recession, deep cuts to the benefits system, and a comparative lack of new homes being built have all contributed to increased levels of homelessness over the last few years. With this in mind, QED Property recently collaborated with WCEC Architecture and the Brighton Housing Trust to build a new shipping container-based housing development in Brighton, UK, for people at risk of homelessness. Read More
— Architecture

Parasitic shelter is available to anyone who needs it

Can "guerrilla architecture" be used to promote radical collective ideas? Such is the intriguing premise behind Bow-House. Created by French architect Stéphane Malka, who has a keen interest in using his skills to help reclaim neglected inner-city areas for those less fortunate, the project comprises a shelter built from recycled materials that is available to anyone who needs a place to stay. Read More
— Architecture

Could the eco-friendly Binishell dome be set for a revival?

It may not come as a surprise that a papier-mâché-like building technique using an inflatable membrane and concrete dome is yet to really take hold. It was in the 1960s that architect Dr Dante Bini pioneered the Binishell as a cheaper and more eco-friendly way of construction. While this led to the building of more than a thousand domes, the practice was largely abandoned, due in part to concerns surrounding their stability. Dante's son Nicolo, also an architect, is now looking to revive the Binishell method, with a view to providing low-cost housing solutions around the world. Read More
— Architecture

Living in style 12 meters from a busy railway line

Architects Pitman Tozer have built a 7-story housing block in Mint Street, east London, for Peabody housing that combines market-rate and subsidized apartments in a modern, stylish, efficient building located only 12 meters (40 ft) from a busy railway viaduct. In a departure from the harsh functional towers usually associated with such tight urban sites, the Mint Street building is a pleasant, colorful, curved form that offers living spaces with plenty of light and humane proportions. Read More
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