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HIV

A dissolving tampon could offer fast-acting HIV protection (Image: University of Washingto...

Researchers at the University of Washington (UW) have developed a material that could offer women a new means of protection against HIV. Demonstrated in the form of a tampon, the material is capable of carrying substantial loads of medicine, dissolving and releasing the drugs once its comes into contact with moisture.  Read More

Upon approval for use by the US, a generic version of Gilead's HIV drug TAF will be made a...

Medicine Patent Pool (MPP), a not-for-profit organization, has partnered with pharmaceutical company Gilead Sciences to produce a generic version of a new HIV treatment drug in India and China that will be distributed in 112 countries.  Read More

Though in its very early stages, the Temple University research may prove to be a critical...

Researchers from Temple University School of Medicine have discovered how to permanently extricate HIV-1 from human cells, possibly avoiding the need for lifelong drug treatment. Though in its very early stages, this may prove to be a critical step in permanently defeating the disease.  Read More

Scientists at the Oregon Health and Science University have announced a positive step towa...

A very promising vaccine candidate for HIV/AIDS has shown the ability to completely clear the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), a very aggressive form of HIV that leads to AIDS in monkeys. Developed at the Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute at the Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU), the vaccine proved successful in about fifty percent of the subjects tested and could lead to a human vaccine preventing the onset of HIV/AIDS and even cure patients currently on anti-retroviral drugs.  Read More

A new gene therapy approach could lead to the end of drug treatments for HIV patients (Ima...

One of the biggest problems in treating HIV patients is the amount of daily individual medications it takes to keep the virus at bay. In a new study, scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine have engineered a new approach to tailored gene therapy that they say makes key cells of the immune system resistant to attack from the HIV virus, which may eventually lead to the removal of life-long dependencies on drugs for patients living with HIV.  Read More

'If this could be used as a treatment one day, it is conceivable that patients would only ...

Scientists at The Rockefeller University have found that harnessing proteins from the human immune system can suppress the HIV virus in mice. Potentially, this could lead to a therapeutic approach to treating the virus that does not require a daily application of drugs.  Read More

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