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HIV and AIDS

Medical

Gene editing could provide a cure for HIV

While antiretroviral drugs do a good job of keeping HIV infections under control, scientists are working hard to come up with a full cure for the condition. A team of researchers from the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University is making real progress in that regard, successfully testing a gene editing system, demonstrating its ability to eliminate the virus from DNA in human cells grown in culture.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

HIV-prevention vaginal ring proves effective in African trial

While condoms and preventative drugs are effective at blocking HIV transmission, for women in developing regions like sub-Saharan Africa, such methods can be too expensive or impractical for continual use. A new treatment, which provides patients with a more long-term protective solution in the form of a drug-releasing vaginal ring, has proved partially effective in a new study.
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Medical

New compound that blocks multiple HIV infections shows promise as AIDS vaccine

A novel vaccine for the AIDS virus may become possible through a new compound proving highly effective in preventing HIV infection. While testing has only been carried out on monkeys so far, the scientists behind the development say that with its ability to block multiple strains of infection at once, the technique has huge potential to one day provide long-lasting protection against the deadly virus. Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Intravaginal ring could block HIV transmission to women

According to UNAIDS, a member of the United Nations Development Group, 58 percent of people living with HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa are women. Although preventative drugs and condoms do block the transmission of HIV, neither are always practical, available or affordable in developing nations. Help could be on its way, however, in the form of an anti-HIV intravaginal ring that is worn continuously for up to 30 days. Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Promising vaccine candidate could lead to a definitive cure for HIV

A very promising vaccine candidate for HIV/AIDS has shown the ability to completely clear the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), a very aggressive form of HIV that leads to AIDS in monkeys. Developed at the Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute at the Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU), the vaccine proved successful in about fifty percent of the subjects tested and could lead to a human vaccine preventing the onset of HIV/AIDS and even cure patients currently on anti-retroviral drugs.Read More

Fighting HIV with HIV could mean a cure for AIDS

Although there is still much work to do before human trials can even be considered, a scientist from Australia’s Queensland Institute of Medical Research has created a protein that reportedly keeps HIV from progressing into AIDS. Perhaps ironically, that protein is a mutated form of one found in the HIV virus itself.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Nanostructured fabric could protect women against pregnancy and HIV

While condoms are the only things that protect against both unwanted pregnancies and HIV, a lot of people aren’t big fans of stopping to put them on. Additionally, women are sometimes put in an awkward role, needing to pressure the man to use the thing – although female condoms certainly do exist, their bulkiness makes them rather unpopular. Now, however, a team of scientists from the University of Washington are working on a type of dissolvable fabric that could be used by women both for contraception and HIV protection.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Cows used to produce milk that protects against HIV

Despite the misgivings that many people have surrounding cow’s milk, it is a good source of nutrients such as calcium and vitamin D. Now, thanks to scientists at Melbourne University, special milk may also be used to protect people from HIV. Working with the Australian biotechnology company Immuron Ltd, a team led by Dr. Marit Kramski has vaccinated pregnant cows with an HIV protein – the first milk that those animals produced after giving birth contained HIV-disabling antibodies.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

FDA approves first drug to prevent HIV infection

While there are many methods for preventing HIV transmission that work in principle (abstinence, safe sex, monogamy to some extent), in practice efforts to prevent new HIV infections have reached a plateau - about 50 thousand new cases are reported every year in the United States and no progress has been made on reducing this number for at least 15 years, with the overall rate of infection remaining stable since at least 2004. In response to the almost complete lack of effective prevention methods, the U.S. FDA (Food and Drug Administration) has now approved the prophylactic use of the anti-retroviral combination drug Truvada, to reduce the risk of people acquiring HIV. Read More

Medical

FDA approves 20 minute take-home HIV test

One of the biggest problems in fighting the spread of AIDS has always been convincing people to have themselves tested regularly. Unfortunately, getting someone to take a trip to a clinic isn't always easy, particularly in areas where there aren't many options for discreet testing. In a development that could leap right over this privacy hurdle, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has just unanimously approved an over-the-counter HIV test that enables people to test themselves in their own home and receive results in just 20 minutes. Read More

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