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History

— Automotive

Mercedes-Benz to showcase restored 540 K Streamliner and 1914 racer at Pebble Beach

By - August 9, 2014 36 Pictures
What might have been? That's the question posed by the newly restored Mercedes-Benz 1938 540 K Streamliner that will get its international public première at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elégance this month. The streamlined version of the 540 K was originally built to participate in a race that was cancelled due to a minor event called World War Two, but has since been restored to its original condition. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

Bremont Wright Flyer watch incorporates piece of first airplane

By - July 27, 2014 13 Pictures
If you’ve ever wanted to buy the first powered airplane to take flight, sorry, but you’re out of luck. The Wright Flyer that was built by Orville and Wilbur Wright and first flew in 1903 isn't for sale, but if you have US$30,000 going spare, you can buy a bit of it and get a wristwatch in the bargain. Unveiled on July 23 at the Science Museum in London, where the Flyer was on display until after World War II, the Limited Edition Bremont Wright Flyer watch celebrates that historic first flight with each “ultimate aviation-inspired” timepiece containing a swatch of original wing fabric from the 1903 Flyer. Read More

Limited-edition sneakers inspired by Apollo moon boots

As of July 20th, it will be officially 45 years since astronauts first walked on the moon. To mark the occasion, General Electric has teamed up with high-end footwear manufacturer Android Homme and clothing retailer JackThreads to create a limited-edition sneaker known as The Missions. The shoe was inspired by the Apollo 11 crew's moon boots, and incorporates some "spacey" materials. Read More
— Electronics

One of the world's first integrated circuits goes up for auction

By - June 19, 2014 2 Pictures
If it weren't for the microchip, your smartphone would be size of a building and need its own power plant to work. Thanks to the integrated circuit and its modern incarnation in the microchip, electronics are a bit easier to carry around than that, and this week, Christie’s put one of the very first integrated circuits up for auction. Designed and constructed in 1958 by Texas Instruments, it's one of the three earliest "chips" ever made and went on the block with an estimated value of up to US$2 million. Read More
— Military

RAF recreates historic D-Day recon photo

By - June 6, 2014 6 Pictures
Seventy years ago, the greatest military operation in history was launched as the Allied forces landed on the beaches of Normandy to liberate Nazi-occupied Europe in what history recalls as D-Day. We’re used to seeing newsreel images of marines and infantrymen rushing from landing craft in the face of the German guns, but overhead there was another war raging as men in fragile aircraft risked their lives to capture vital images of the battle’s progress. As part of the 70th-anniversary commemoration, RAF Tornado jets from II (Army Co-operation) Squadron (II (AC) Sqn) recreated that historic D-Day recon mission over Normandy, giving us a glimpse of how far aerial reconnaissance has come in three generations. Read More
— Science

Nanoscale research may help preserve Leonardo da Vinci’s vanishing portrait

By - June 4, 2014 1 Picture
A famous red chalk on paper drawing, widely accepted as a self-portrait of Leonardo da Vinci, is rapidly deteriorating from the effects of years of exposure to pollution, light, and heat. Worst of all, many centuries in unregulated and humid storage has led to extensive yellowing and browning of the paper. Recently, however, researchers from Italy and Poland have developed a new non-destructive, nano-level method to identify the root causes of the degradation and assist in planning appropriate conservation strategies. Read More
— Good Thinking

British public to vote on 21st century Longitude Prize

By - May 19, 2014 3 Pictures
Three hundred years ago, the British Parliament established the Longitude prize; one of the most important technology competitions in history. Longitude Prize 2014 hopes to duplicate that feat with a new competition with a £10 million prize aimed at solving one of today’s great technological challenges, with the British public voting for which issue the prize will be given to. Read More

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