Highlights from the 2014 LA Auto Show

History

The sale includes memorabilia from the US and Soviet space programs

If you've ever wanted to own a space suit from the NASA Mercury project, or maybe a pack of gum that went to the Moon, here’s your chance. On Tuesday, Bonhams auction house is selling a bumper crop of space exploration artifacts as part of its sixth annual Space History Sale in New York. The auction will see 296 lots of memorabilia from the US and Soviet space programs go on the block, including a Mercury-era space suit.  Read More

Virtual simulation image of the sun atop the obelisk with the Altar of Peace in the foregr...

Campus Martius, also known as the Campus of Mars, was built by the Roman Senate just outside the ancient Rome city walls back in 9 BCE. It was built to celebrate the peace brought upon the Roman people as a result of Emperor Agustus’s military conquests. Thanks to a complex computer simulation created by the Institute for Digital Intermedia Arts (IDIA) for Indiana University's School of Informatics and Computing, it is now possible to verify if and how solar alignments influenced the positioning of the different objects on site.  Read More

The four world record breakers at the National Motor Museum

Records are made to be broken, and the British have a habit of breaking World Land Speed Records more than anyone else. Last week, Don Wales, grandson of Sir Malcolm Campbell, opened a new multimedia exhibit entitled “Britain & For The Hell Of It” at the National Motor Museum, Beaulieu, Hampshire. Celebrating the golden age of British record breaking from the 1920s through the 1960s, it features four famous record-breaking cars as well as souvenirs and memorabilia, trophies and personal items belonging to the drivers.  Read More

The Web was born 25 years ago, on March 12, 1989 (Image: picture man/Wikipedia)

On March 12, 1989 Tim Berners-Lee, while working as a contractor at the CERN laboratories in Switzerland, submitted Information Management: A Proposal, which sparked the greatest advance in information technology since Gutenberg invented the printing press. At the time, it was just a way for CERN scientists to share data, but a quarter of a century later, it’s grown from a curiosity into a necessity without which our world can no longer function.  Read More

The Cultybraggan shelter is up for auction with bids starting at £200,000 (US$300,000)

You can never be too careful, and if you have a upwards of £200,000 (US$330,000) laying around, you could sleep a little easier as the new owner of a nuclear bunker. Built by the British government during the Cold War to ride out a Soviet attack, the decommissioned Cultybraggan Camp bunker is being put on the block as part of a plan to preserve and redevelop the former British Army camp.  Read More

The Energy Bunker was originally constructed in 1943 to serve as a Nazi anti-aircraft bunk...

Energy and utilities company Hamburg Energie has joined forces with IBA Hamburg to transform a former Nazi anti-aircraft flak bunker into a green energy power plant. The Hamburg-based "Energy Bunker" has already begun producing energy for the local community, but once running at full capacity will provide up to 3,000 homes with heating, and another 1,000 homes with electricity.  Read More

Colossus was the world's first programmable digital electronic computer and gave the Allie...

Sometimes the most important victories in a war don’t occur on battlefields and don’t involve weaponry. On Wednesday, a very unusual group of veterans gathered at Bletchley Park, Buckinghamshire to commemorate an event that shortened the Second World War and saved countless lives. They were the men and women who built Colossus, the world's first programmable electronic digital computer, and they and their families were at the National Museum of Computing for a re-enactment of the day the famous machine began its code-breaking operations against the Axis forces.  Read More

Phantom Drophead Coupé is based on Sir Malcolm Campbell's Blue Bird K3 speedboat

Rolls-Royce is so closely associated with luxury cars that it's often easy to overlook the fact that the badge has also graced everything from jet engines to nuclear reactors. As a reminder of the company’s history, Rolls-Royce gave us a hint on Tuesday of its new Bespoke Waterspeed Collection, with the release of a sketch of its Phantom Drophead Coupé. The car features a special design to honor the achievements of land and water racing legend, Sir Malcolm Campbell.  Read More

Built in 1898, the P1 was the very first Porsche

Ask most petrolheads when the first Porsche was built and the likely answer you’ll get is 1948, when the Type 356 rolled out. In fact, that’s off by fifty years. This week, the Porsche Museum in Stuttgart-Zuffenhausen will mark its fifth anniversary with the unveiling of the rediscovered and unrestored first Porsche, the P1 built in 1898. Recovered from a warehouse where it languished forgotten for over a century, it’s now the centerpiece of a new permanent exhibit telling the early history of Porsche and its founder.  Read More

Vespa's 150 TAP (Troupes Aéro Portées) was designed to be dropped into battle by parachute...

For motorcyclists wishing to balance the inequities of the road-going pecking order, this could be the perfect mount. Vespa's 150 TAP might only be good for 40 mph, but the integrated M20 light anti-armor cannon shoots 75 mm rounds capable of penetrating 100 mm of armor from four miles.  Read More

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