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High-resolution

Many of us enjoy listening to a good tune or two when out and about, and a goodly proportion of that mobile music will likely be sourced from a smartphone or tablet. For those who prefer high quality sounds though, dedicated players like Neil Young's Pono and those from iRiver's Astell&Kern are probably going to be on the menu. The latter has announced a new flagship portable audio player aimed squarely at audiophiles and sound professionals, which is capable of 32-bit/384 kHz bit-to-bit decoding without the need for conversion but comes at a rather high cost.

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British headphone maker RHA impressed us last month when its T10 heavyweights landed on the review bench. Now the company has announced the T20 in-ear headphones featuring a brand new dynamic driver technology named DualCoil. As well as promising true-to-life audio reproduction, the new earphones conform to the Hi-Res Audio standard as defined by the Japan Audio Society.

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In November last year, British headphone maker Reid Heath Audio (RHA) released a new flagship in-ear headphone model called the T10i that featured interchangeable tuning filters which altered the frequency response from the company's reference signature to focus on either lows or highs. The high fidelity, noise isolating earphones went on to earn the company a Red Dot Award in the Product Design category. RHA has recently added a sibling that's sonically the same but doesn't have an inline control and is a little cheaper, and it's this T10 model that Gizmag has been taking for a test drive. Read More
Audio-Technica has launched a new range of SonicPro in-ear headphones. Designed to get the most from high resolution audio sources, the range includes the ATH-CKR10 and ATH-CKR9 earphones which feature proprietary push-pull driver technology that's said to rival larger headphones for clarity and accuracy, particularly in the mids and highs. Read More
This week at the Farnborough Airshow, BAE Systems showed off its latest Helmet-Mounted Display (HMD), the Striker II flight helmet. The unit not only provides a digital, visor-projected night vision system that is equivalent or better than current HMD systems, but it has also seen a weight reduction for greater safety and comfort. Read More
The Retina displays featured on Apple's iPhone 4 and 5 models pack a pixel density of 326 ppi, with individual pixels measuring 78 micrometers. That might seem plenty good enough given the average human eye is unable to differentiate between the individual pixels, but scientists in the UK have now developed technology that could lead to extremely high-resolution displays that put such pixel densities to shame. Read More
After making a quick show and tell at Computex back in June, MSI has now released what's claimed to be the world's first 3K gaming laptop. The 15.6-inch GT60 features a 4th generation Core i7 processor, GeForce graphics, combined SSD/HDD storage and customizable color backlighting for the keyboard for after hours gaming. Read More
Neutrons have a set of unique properties that make them better suited than light, electrons, or x-rays for looking at the physics and chemistry going on inside an object. Scientists working out of MIT's Nuclear Reactor Laboratory have now invented and built a high-resolution neutron microscope, a feat that required developing new approaches to neutron optics. Read More
Thinking big is no challenge for architects Michael Hansmeyer and Benjamin Dillenburger; they've created a 3D printed room using algorithms to design its intricate cathedral-like interior. Assembled out of 64 massive sandstone-like parts printed out with a huge 3D printer, the room contains 260 million surfaces printed at a resolution of a tenth of a millimeter. The 11 ton room took a month to print but only a day to assemble. The revolutionary fabrication methods the duo used to print the room will, they believe, open the door to printing architecture, freeing architects to create new unimaginable buildings and also restore old ones. Read More
Researchers at MIT’s Media Lab have developed a new form of holographic projector that may enable the introduction of practical color 3D holographic video displays as well as higher-resolution 2D displays with lower power consumption. The new projector is built using principles of guided wave optics to construct the spatial light modulator (SLM) that is the heart of digital holography. The MIT holographic projector, which contains an SLM costing US$10 to fabricate, provides 3D images at 30 frames per second (fps) with a resolution similar to that of a standard-definition TV. Read More
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