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— Science

Superhydrophobic coating allows water to boil without bubbles

You know that thing that water does when it boils? The thing with the bubbles? Turns out, it doesn't really need to do that at all, with scientists finding a way to make boiling water a completely bubble-free zone. Researchers from Northwestern University, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology in Saudi Arabia and Melbourne University in Australia teamed up to prevent water from bubbling when it boils by using tiny spheres coated with a hydrophobic material. Read More
— Good Thinking

HeatSeeker mister keeps firefighters cool

Firefighters face many dangers, including burns, smoke inhalation and structure collapses. Because they're required to wear all that heavy gear while performing strenuous activities, however, they also risk heat stroke. That’s why firefighter Michael Robinson invented the HeatSeeker – a device that attaches to a fire truck’s existing hose port, creating a cooling mist. Read More
— Environment

Radiator Labs transforms radiators into energy-efficient heaters

Its idea may be simple, but that did not stop Radiator Labs winning the MIT Clean Energy Prize with its controllable box that can be retrofitted to radiators to boost the efficiency of hot water and steam heating systems. The heavily insulated housings physically cover the radiator, trapping heat in the system, and strictly controlling the amount that is let into the room. This prevents homes becoming over-heated, and wasteful heat loss as people open windows to compensate. Read More
— Automotive

Anti-stick coating reduces F1 downforce losses

In the last two years, UK coatings specialist Zircotec has helped 10 of the 12 Formula One teams to protect their composite diffusers from exhaust gasses via the use of ceramic coatings. To do so, it created a coating that allows composites to function in temperatures above their melting point! This year, its engineers have been busy on a new challenge, as debris from tires has been causing build-up on aerodynamic surfaces which has been reducing down-force. Read More
— Science

Flexible, heat-dissipating parts for electronics from spider silk?

Over the years, we’ve seen Spiderman use his webbing to catch villains, swing between buildings, and even parachute from great heights. In all that time, however, the opportunity never came up for him to use it to conduct heat. As it turns out, it would have been perfect for the job. Although materials from living things generally don’t conduct heat well, a team of scientists from Iowa State University have discovered that spider silk does so 800 times better than any other organic material ever tested. Because the silk is also very strong and stretchable, it could have a number of applications in human technology. Read More