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A'ME's Clamp-On MTB Heated Tri Grips are designed to warm the hands of winter cyclists

While heated handlebar grips may be nothing new for snowmobilers or motorcyclists, they’re something that mountain bikers have never been offered before – or have they? The comments board is open, if you know of a previous product. In any case, A’ME’s Clamp-On MTB Heated Tri Grips are just such an animal. If you’re a cold-weather cyclist who doesn’t like wearing thick gloves that cause your hands to get sweaty, they may be just what you’re looking for.  Read More

Diamond-Power skylight panels are designed to harness solar energy, while reducing the sol...

There’s no doubt that skylights make for psychologically-nicer buildings, while also reducing the amount of electricity required for daytime artificial lighting. If they let in too much sunlight, however, they can actually increase the amount of electricity needed for air conditioning. California-based EnFocus is attacking the situation from two ends – its Diamond-Power panels diffuse sunlight to keep interior heat down, while also harnessing it to create electricity.  Read More

Data center servers could be used to heat homes and offices suggests a new Microsoft Resea...

The U.S. EPA estimated that servers and data centers were responsible for up to 1.5 percent of the total U.S. electricity consumption, or roughly 0.5 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions, in 2007. With companies such as Apple and Google strongly pushing the move to cloud computing, that figure is likely to increase significantly in the coming decade. Since a lot of energy is consumed keeping the computer systems cool, colder climates are seen as more favorable sites for data centers. But a new paper from Microsoft Research proposes a different approach that would see servers, dubbed Data Furnaces, distributed to office buildings and homes where they would act as a primary heat source.  Read More

Some Japanese city-dwellers are cooling down with the use of spray-on foam and gel this su...

While some inventions originating in Japan can seem a little quirky by Western standards, many of those are at the same time rather innovative. This is certainly the case with the cooling foams and gels in spray-cans, which are cooling down Japanese city-dwellers this summer.  Read More

A newly-created alloy (center disc) is able to convert heat directly into electricity (Ima...

The heat given off by electronics, automobile engines, factories and other sources is a potentially huge source of energy, and various technologies are being developed in order to capture that heat, and then convert it into electricity. Thanks to an alloy that was recently developed at the University of Minnesota, however, a step in that process could be saved – the new material is able to convert heat directly into electricity.  Read More

A 'heat mean signature' of a human hand is used to perceive the six segments of the overal...

When we see a hand, regardless of whether it's open, in a fist, or pointing a finger, we still recognize it as a hand. If a computer has only been taught to recognize an open hand, however, it will probably have no idea what a fisted hand is. Getting computer vision systems to interpret images more like people do - to realize that a fist is a hand, for instance - has been one of the aims of artificial intelligence researchers for some time now. Things in that field may be about to take a step forward, however, as scientists from Indiana's Purdue University have just announced two new methods of three-dimensional object recognition, both based around heat diffusion.  Read More

The prototype 'thermally activated cooling system' combines two technologies, for harnessi...

Automobiles, appliances, power plants, factories and electrical utilities all waste one thing: heat. More specifically, they produce heat as a by-product of their normal operations, but that heat is just dispersed into the air instead of being put to use. Researchers from Oregon State University, however, have created a prototype system that harnesses waste heat to (rather ironically) cool the device that’s creating the heat in the first place. While it isn’t the first system to do so, it is claimed to be unusually efficient ... and, it can generate electricity.  Read More

Coffee Joulies incorporate a phase change material to quickly cool your hot coffee to the ...

Unless you’re someone who drinks their coffee fast, you likely face a bit of a conundrum when it comes to temperature – either you start with it at the perfect temperature but end up with it getting too cold, or you end up with it cooling down to the perfect temperature by starting with it too hot. Two young entrepreneurs, however, have created a product that they claim quickly cools your hot coffee to the right temperature, but then holds it at that temperature twice as long as it would stay there otherwise. Their product is called Coffee Joulies.  Read More

Green Logs are fireplace logs made from compressed Giant King Grass, and are said to have ...

As winter tightens its icy, gloomy grip on the Northern Hemisphere, many of us are turning to our fireplaces or wood-burning stoves for physical and psychological warmth. Unfortunately, however, burning wood releases carbon into the atmosphere – a conundrum for people who want to minimize their CO2 footprint but still stay warm. U.S. company VIASPACE Green Energy, however, has just started selling a product that it claims will provide customers with fire fodder, while being almost carbon-neutral: fireplace logs made from compressed Giant King Grass.  Read More

A molecule of fulvalene diruthenium, which changes its configuration when it absorbs heat,...

In figuring out how a molecule called fulvalene diruthenium works to store and release heat, researchers at MIT may have paved the way for a rechargeable battery that stores heat instead of electricity. Although the molecule was discovered in 1996, ruthenium’s rarity and cost has ruled out it’s widespread use but the researchers say understanding the fundamental mechanism of how the molecule works should make it possible to find similar chemicals based on more abundant, less expensive materials.  Read More

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