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Heart Disease

Health & Wellbeing

Vaccine shows promise as cheap, effective treatment for prevention of high cholesterol

Cholesterol in the body serves an important role by producing vitamin D, hormones and other molecules that help in our food digestion. But when the protein known as PCSK9, which dictates its levels in our blood, retains too much of it, arteries begin to clog up and increase the risk of heart disease and stroke. Researchers have now developed a vaccine that inhibits the activity of this particular protein, which reduces cholesterol levels in animals and suggests a cheap and effective way to prevent dangerously high levels in humans mightn't be so far away.Read More

Medical

Support bath enables 3D printing of soft biomaterials

When it comes to surgical procedures on internal organs, the heart can be one of the most difficult to work with. Heart tissue doesn't repair itself like that of other body parts, so those with failing hearts only have the option of joining a long waitlist in hopes of receiving a transplant in time. All of this may change in the near future, as a research group at Carnegie Mellon University has demonstrated a method of 3D bioprinting with soft materials.Read More

Medical

Hydrogel boosts uptake of stem cells in repairing damaged hearts

With their ability to help repair damaged muscle, stem cells have shown promise as tools for rebuilding the body's organs, but their potential is yet to be fully realized – especially when it comes to the heart. Part of this is because only a small percentage of stem cells injected actually survive the process, but a newly developed liquid could make life a little easier for freshly transplanted cells. Researchers have found that encapsulating them in a sticky hydrogel gives them the ability to not only survive, but multiply and improve the injured heart's ability to pump blood. Read More

Medical

Protein patch restores heart tissue and function after a heart attack

Though sufferers of heart attacks may survive the initial event, they cause permanent damage to the organ in the form of scar tissue, which affects its ability to pump blood. Scientists around the world are working on this problem, with hydrogels, human stem cells and even bioengineered tissue that sticks together like Velcro all offering possible solutions. But the latest promising advance comes from a team of researchers that has developed a simple protein patch that restores animal hearts almost to normal function.Read More

Medical

Harnessing the survival powers of cancer cells could wipe out heart disease

The same genes that allow many cancers to proliferate and thrive could in the future be repurposed as a force for good. A study at the San Diego State University (SDSU) Heart Institute has found that mouse hearts regenerate cells better, causing the mice to live longer, when their progenitor cells are modified to over-express a key gene in cancer production. The researchers believe this could lead to a new treatment for people with heart disease or who have suffered from other age-related cardiac problems.Read More

Medical

Miniature pacemaker designed to be implanted in fetuses

In the near future, it's entirely possible that babies with heart defects will be born with complete pacemakers already installed. That's because scientists at Children's Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) and the University of Southern California have developed the world's first fully-implantable pacemaker for fetuses. Read More

Medical

Drug-delivering nano "drones" to help prevent heart attacks

Scientists have developed targeted, biodegradable nano "drones" to deliver anti-inflammatory drugs that heal and stabilize arterial plaque in mice. Their work could pave the way for more effective prevention of heart attack and stroke in humans caused by atherosclerosis, in which artery walls thicken and suffer reduced plasticity due to an accumulation of white blood cells.Read More

Medical

FDA approves blood test that predicts risk of coronary heart disease

Coronary heart disease (CHD) kills more than 385,000 people in the United States each year, and more than half of those who die suddenly have no previous symptoms. A new blood test that could reduce CHD-related illness and mortality by predicting the risk of future heart disease has been cleared by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The PLAC Test for Lp-PLA2 screens for cardiovascular inflammation which can lead to a build up of rupture-prone plaque and result in a heart attack or stroke. Read More

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