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Health & Wellbeing Feature

Should you fear aspartame?

Soft drink giant PepsiCo recently announced its plans to stop sweetening Diet Pepsi with aspartame in response to growing consumer concern, yet the company, regulators and many medical authorities say the potential detrimental effect of the artificial sweetener on human health is overblown. So, what's really going on here and who should you believe?Read More

Wearable "CH4" fart tracker keeps a daily log of your rear end gas emissions

Healthy eating might have brought you a happier, more energetic lifestyle, but have you stopped to think what effect your five daily servings of fruit and veggies are having on everyone around you? Move over, calorie counting. The Kickstarted "CH4" is a portable device designed to keep track of your personal exhaust fumes with the sole goal of helping you find the meals that make you toot the least, for the sake of everyone who spends long stretches of time with you in cramped or poorly ventilated spaces. Read More

Medical

Malaria vaccine candidate shown to prevent thousands of cases

A new study suggests that RTS,S/AS01, the prime candidate for a malaria vaccine and the first one to reach large-scale clinical testing, is partially effective especially among young African children for a period of up to four years after vaccination. The vaccine could potentially prevent millions of cases of clinical malaria, particularly in areas of high transmission like sub-Saharian Africa, and in the age group in which malaria is known to be the most lethal.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Inkjet printers could produce paper sensors that identify dangerous food and water contaminants

Sensors that identify infectious disease and food contaminants may soon be printed on paper using ordinary office inkjet printers. Researchers at McMaster University have developed a prototype that could lead to a commercial product in the next few years which helps doctors and scientists in the field quickly detect certain types of cancer or bacterial and respiratory infections or monitor toxin levels in water.Read More

Science

Scientists developing healthier, better-tasting chocolate

Good news if you're hooked on chocolate. Researchers from Ghent University in Belgium and the University of Ghana have developed a new technique for making chocolate that results in it being both healthier and more flavorful. The technique differs from conventional chocolate production in that cacao beans are roasted at a lower temperature and bean pods are left unopened for five days rather than split open right away. It is expected to be particularly useful in countries where cacao beans have less natural flavor and antioxidant activity.Read More

Mobile Technology

Apple’s ResearchKit: Can apps take medical research to the next level?

These days, apps are ubiquitous as tools to improve health and fitness. But Apple thinks it can do more than that and even take medical research to a new level, thanks to its power to crowdsource subjects in clinical tests and monitoring studies. Can the company's recently-announced ResearchKit, an open source software framework for researchers, be the medical study game changer that it's aiming to be?Read More

Medical

Smart bandage detects bedsores before they appear

Bedsores are more than a pain in the backside for bedridden folk, they can develop into dangerous infections and heighten the chances of a patient dying. While swollen ulcers on the skin are a pretty sure sign of their presence, by this point it is often too late for some of their effects to be reversed. But a team of researchers have developed what could function as an early warning system, a smart bandage containing flexible electronics that detects tissue damage before it becomes visible on the surface of the skin. Read More

Medical

Researchers identify how cells get their orders to heal wounds

When you cut on your finger or scrape your knee, cells rush to the wound and repair or replace the damaged tissue. But how exactly this works – in particular how certain cells become "leaders" in the process – has long been a mystery. Now researchers at the University of Arizona (UA) have identified the mechanisms that cause and regulate this collective cell migration. Armed with this knowledge, biomedical engineers will be able to design new tissue regeneration treatments for diabetes and heart disease as well as for slowing or stopping the spread of cancer.Read More

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