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Health

— Automotive

Ford packs tech inside the new S-MAX Concept

Ford Europe has unveiled a car that may one day be able to tell if you’re having a heart attack at the wheel and call for help. Recently rolled out in Cologne, the company's S-Max Concept is said to combine a new style language with a new suite of interactive technologies, that do everything from parking the car entirely under its own control to monitoring the driver’s heartbeat. Read More
— Drones

Defikopter drone air-drops a defibrillator to EMTs on the ground

We've seen flying drones designed to deliver food and even beer on command, but a new autonomous aircraft from a non-profit organization in Germany could provide medical equipment to remote areas in an emergency. The Defikopter is a UAV that can be activated by a smartphone app to automatically take to the skies and drop a defibrillator to medical personnel on the ground, shaving precious seconds off of the time it takes for a person to receive treatment for cardiac arrest. Read More
— Mobile Technology

Could Microsoft Surface help the NFL to prevent brain injuries?

In the NFL, head trauma and other injuries are no joke. How does a team's medical staff know which call to make after a nasty blow? Can technology help them to know whether it's best to leave a player in the game or send him to the showers? Microsoft believes that a new enterprise app for Surface could play a role in helping teams to answer those tough questions. As part of a broader Surface on the Sidelines initiative, the X2 app is one of the best examples we've seen of how a professional-focused PC like the Surface Pro could potentially be used to actually change the way people work. Read More
— Health & Wellbeing

Promising antibacterial coating created from green tea and salt

Researchers at Northwestern University have discovered new ways of utilizing the properties of naturally occurring polyphenols found in green tea, red wine and dark chocolate. Dissolving polyphenol powders in water with a small amount of salt instantly produces transparent coatings that kill bacteria on contact, have antioxidant qualities and are non-toxic. The sticky nature of polyphenols and the low cost of materials could open the door to a wide range of uses for these coatings. Read More
— Health & Wellbeing

Researchers preserve cancer-fighting properties in frozen broccoli

Broccoli is one of those foods we’re told to eat as youngsters because it’s good for us. Unfortunately, researchers at the University of Illinois (U of I) found some of that goodness, namely the vegetable’s cancer-protective benefits, doesn’t survive the process its subjected to before reaching the freezers at supermarkets. Thankfully, the researchers followed up their initial research and found a simple way to preserve broccoli’s cancer-fighting properties. Read More
— Health & Wellbeing

Scientists developing Bluetooth tooth that spies on your oral habits

Tooth fillings acting as radio receivers may be nothing more than a myth, but scientists at the National Taiwan University are developing an artificial tooth that would send rather than receive transmissions. They’re working on embedding a sensor in a tooth to keep an eye on oral goings on, along with a Bluetooth transmitter to transmit the data and tell your doctor what your mouth's been up to. Read More
— Health & Wellbeing

Smart Diapers test chidren's urine to monitor their health over time

Diapers usually rank very low on the list of items in need of a high-tech upgrade, despite products like the TweetPee recently hitting the market. But unlike a Twitter-enabled diaper, which provides information that anyone with a nose could figure out on their own, a new diaper from Pixie Scientific could actually warn parents of health issues before they become serious. The Smart Diaper uses several reactive agents and an app to monitor irregularities in an infant's urine over time and alerts parents if they need to visit a doctor. Read More
— Health & Wellbeing

Qardio unveils portable, wireless cardiovascular monitoring devices

Thanks to the miniaturization of electronics and wireless technology, detailed cardiovascular monitoring no longer requires a visit to the doctor's clinic or a hospital. A new wave of cardiovascular monitoring devices can be carried or worn by patients as they go about their daily routine, with the collected data able to be transmitted wirelessly to healthcare professionals and family members. Healthcare company Qardio has unveiled two such devices that allow patients suffering, or at risk of developing cardiovascular conditions, to better monitor their health. Read More
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