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Heads Up Display

Given that both heads up displays for our cars and smart glasses are emerging (if still niche) product categories, it’s not surprising that a company would try to combine the two into a single product. Earlier this week we had the opportunity to try out Mini’s new Augmented Vision, a set of driving goggles that brings some of the features of your standard heads-up display to a set of glasses, making for an interesting look at the future of both connected eyewear and connected vehicles. Read More
A modern heads-up display (HUD) projects a great deal of what was traditionally shown on a car’s instrument panel onto the windscreen, and is becoming must-have equipment for high-end modern cars. However, as many of us don’t drive high-end expensive cars, we don’t get to take advantage of this technology. That’s where Navdy comes in. Currently in prototype form, the device promises to bring a projection display with voice and gesture controls to any car. Read More
Land Rover teased its new Discovery Vision concept last week in the run-up to its début at 2014 New York International Auto Show on April 16, and now the car maker reveals a bit more about the Vision – or rather, less. That’s because the latest tease demonstrates a new technology that uses cameras and heads-up displays to make the front of the car “invisible” to the driver. Read More
"Great battles are won with artillery" – Napoleon Bonaparte. In the 21st century, he’d probably change that to information. The trick is to get that information to soldiers on the front line quickly and in a manner that won’t distract them from the job at hand. To this end, BAE Systems’ Electronic Systems has developed the Q-Warrior – a head-up display for foot soldiers that’s designed to provide a full-color, high resolution 3D display of the battlefield situation and assets. Read More
Head-up displays, or HUDs, are claimed to make driving much safer and easier – instead of looking away from the road and shifting their focus to the dashboard console, drivers just need to glance at an unobtrusive display projected onto their view of the road. NUVIZ now wants to bring HUD technology to motorcyclists, in the form of its Ride:HUD helmet system. Read More
Recon Instruments first came to our attention back in 2010 with the release of the world's first heads up display (HUD) for skiers and snowboarders. The company has now outed the fourth generation of the device, the Snow2, which adds extra processing grunt and puts the focus on connectivity. Read More
It was just this July that we heard about Garmin's HUD. It's a portable device that sits on the dashboard of the user's car, working with their smartphone to project a head-up display (HUD) onto the inside of their windshield. Russian startup Hudway has taken that same basic approach with its self-named free app, except that it utilizes just the phone – no projector is required. Read More
One major obstacle that's been holding the Recon Instruments heads-up display from really taking off is that it was designed for goggles. That's great for niche sports like skiing, snowboarding and skydiving, but it's useless for more common activities like running and cycling. The company is working to address that inherent shortcoming with the Jet, a pair of heads-up display sunglasses with a much more ambitious set of sporting and non-sporting uses. Read More
For pretty much any endurance-oriented sport, athletes like to be able to reach a target hear rate when they’re training. Typically, this is done using a sensor integrated into a chest strap, that’s linked to a sports watch, smartphone, or even to a heads-up display in a set of glasses. While there are sports watches designed for swimmers, users have to stop swimming in order to read them. With the Instabeat, however, swimmers get the heads-up option in the form of colored LEDs that are projected through the bottom of their goggles. Read More
Recon Instruments has been offering a ski goggles with heads-up displays for several years. Thing is, not many sports require goggles, so its technology has been limited to things like skiing and skydiving. German sports computer manufacturer O-Synce has a heads-up design that should prove far more universal. Its screeneye x sports visor flashes your performance metrics via an integrated display. Read More
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