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Hands-free


— Medical

Agilite Gear develops hands-free medical stretcher

After introducing a hands-free "human backpack", Israeli tactical gear manufacturer Agilite is back with a hands-free solution that allows injured troops to lie flat and be carried to safety. Unlike other stretchers that keep the hands occupied, the FlatEvac sets both hands free. Troops are able to handle their weapons, navigation instruments and other tools while simultaneously carrying their injured battle mate. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

Golden-i wearable hands-free computer interface

Back in 2009, the Kopin Corporation’s Golden-i headset promised a hands-free, natural-speech-recognition interface for wireless remote control over a range of devices including mobile phones, PCs, company networks and wireless systems, but it was also little more than a concept. Four years on, the company is marketing the wearable, hands free computer interfacing devices for heavy and light industries, professionals and first responders. The Golden-i headsets allow the user to send and receive audiovisual information from multiple platforms by means of both voice and motion control while leaving the hands free to get on with the job. Read More

Ford offers location sharing via Glympse app

With all the electronics and technology being engineered into cars these days, the Consumer Electronics Show is starting to feel like an auto show. Automakers have been increasingly using the annual Las Vegas event to highlight their latest tech. At this year's show, Ford is on hand with a new voice-based location-sharing app. Read More
— Telecommunications

UrbanHello aims to make the home phone cool again

Many of today's telecomms users find that their conversational needs are more than satisfied by smartphones, yet most still have a home phone connected to a landline. The latter has received something of a modern make-over at the hands of UrbanHello, a new startup founded in Paris, France by Hervé Artus and Catherine Seys. The appropriately-named Home Phone has simultaneously launched at CES 2013 and on Kickstarter. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

OLED data glasses controlled with eye movements

Imagine that you’re a mechanic whose hands are covered in grease, and you’re trying to follow repair instructions. Every time you need to turn the page or advance the screen, you have to put down your tools and wipe your hands. That’s why scientists from the Fraunhofer Center for Organics, Materials and Electronic Devices Dresden (COMEDD) have developed glasses that allow the wearer to flip pages on a digital document using nothing but their eyes. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

Motorola HC1 Headset Computer with voice recognition and gesture control

Motorola Solutions has released its own head-mounted wearable computer based on Kopin Corporation’s Golden-i headset. Aimed at industrial and military users who need to keep their hands free on the job while viewing documents and schematics or getting help from far afield specialists, the Motorola HC1 Headset Computer places an 800 x 600 (SVGA) full color TFT micro-display at a viewing distance that provides a virtual image size of 15 inches. In keeping with the hands-free theme, the headset can be controlled via voice recognition and gesture controls. Read More
— Music

Go hands-free or hands-on with the Jamboxx breath-driven synth

Digital wind controllers like the Morrison Digital Trumpet give players the power to go beyond mere instrument clones and make virtually any instrument or sound available to the musician. More recently, Ashanti's Beatjazz Hands combined breath, pressure and motion sensors to bring gestures into the equation and free him from the confines of a computer screen. The problem in using such systems for folks with limited cognitive abilities or physical disability is that they can't effectively be used hands-free. A skiing accident in the 1980s left Dave Whalen a quadriplegic, and his burning desire to continue making music has led to the development of Jamboxx, a harmonica-like digital instrument that can be played and controlled using just the head. Read More
— Automotive

Ford SYNC AppLink-equipped vehicles provide allergy forecasts on demand

Seasonal allergies strike 20 percent of Americans every year. Some people suffer so badly that they check the pollen count with the devotion that others pay to the stock market. For some asthma sufferers, an allergy attack can even lead to a life-threatening asthma episode. As part of its program to help motorist manage their health, Ford has announced that cars equipped with its SYNC AppLink system will be able to alert drivers about pollen and other health-related conditions. Read More
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