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Gyro

The Jyrobike is claimed to be able to teach a child to ride a two-wheeler within one after...

Conventional training wheels might be useful in preventing cuts, breaks and bruises, but they can also lead to bad habits and lengthen the process of learning to ride a bike on your own. The team behind the Jyrobike are looking to give budding cyclists a quicker path to two-wheeled success, with a self-balancing bike that uses a gyroscope to keep kids on the straight and narrow.  Read More

MōVI M10 Gyroscopic Camera Mounting System

One of the most defining facets of any filmmaker’s style is how they position and move the camera. Though the time honored “tripod or dolly?” choice expanded with the advent of the Steadicam operator-controlled motion system in the 1980’s, the cost of even renting one (and the operator) have remained out of reach for the new breed digital filmmakers. Enter the MōVI M10 handheld gyroscopic camera mounting system from Freefly Systems – a motorized, triple gimbal system that provides rock-solid smoothness under ridiculous amounts of motion, both small and large, and for a fraction of its cost could offer what the Steadicam does – and potentially a whole lot more.  Read More

The 1967 gyroscopically-stabilized Gyro-X car is being restored by an auto museum

Back in 1967, California-based Gyro Transport Systems built a prototype vehicle known as the Gyro-X. The automobile had just two wheels, one in front and one in the back and, as the car’s name implies, it utilized a built-in gyroscope to remain upright when not moving. Although its developers hoped to take the Gyro-X into production, the company went bankrupt, and the one-and-only specimen of the car became an orphan. For much of the past 40-plus years, that car has passed from owner to owner, its condition deteriorating along the way. Now, it’s about to be restored to its former (weird) glory.  Read More

The Gyrobike is a 3-in-1 training system that takes the user from the first experiments wi...

Training wheels attached to back of a learner's bike frame may well keep the rider upright and in the seat for much of the long journey toward two-wheeled independence, but they can also lead to bad habits and poor form. While re-inventing the wheel often carries negative connotations, the arrival of the Gyrowheel in 2009 put a new positive spin on learning to ride. The gyroscopic balance and stability aid is now about to enter the next stage in its evolution with the release of the 3-in-1 Gyrobike in Europe.  Read More

Black & Decker has announced the new Gyro 4V MAX Lithium-ion Rechargeable Screwdriver, whi...

Motion sensing technology is just about everywhere these days. It allows smartphone or tablet gamers to control onscreen action (or even pilot an RC airplane) by tilting or twisting the device, can help feed the digital music muse and gives personal transport innovations like the Lit C-1 the ability to stand upright all by themselves. Now it's the turn of the powered screwdriver to break into this exciting and magical realm with the launch of the Gyro 4V MAX Lithium-ion Rechargeable Screwdriver from Black & Decker.  Read More

An African Agama lizard, and Tailbot

For some time now, scientists have assumed that dinosaurs’ tails didn’t simply drag on the group behind them, but were instead held out to serve as a counterweight for the giant reptiles’ heavy front ends when running. More recently, however, researchers from the University of California, Berkeley, have discovered that modern-day lizards also use their tails to control the orientation of their bodies when leaping through the air. It’s a discovery that could be applied to devices such as search-and-rescue robots, and in fact already has been. Based on their observations, the UC Berkeley team created a small, tailed robot known as Tailbot.  Read More

The C-1 is a proposed fully-electric and fully-enclosed self-balancing motorcycle

As any avid biker will tell you, motorcycles have a lot of advantages over cars - they use less fuel, accelerate faster, are more maneuverable, can be parked in more places, and don't incorporate the weight of extra seating for passengers who are non-existent on solo commutes. As many other people will tell you, however, motorcycles also leave their occupants open to the rain and cold, and can potentially tip over and scatter those occupants across the road. That's where Lit Motors' C-1 comes into the picture. It's a proposed fully-enclosed two-passenger electric motorbike that uses an electronically-controlled gyroscopic stabilizing system to stay upright when stopped, or even when struck from the side in an accident.  Read More

The Thrustcycle SRT is a three-wheeled vehicle that incorporates a gyro/flywheel system to...

Fans of three-wheeled cars will tell you that the vehicles come in two configurations: delta, with the single wheel in the front, and tadpole, with the single wheel in the back. Well, now there's another type. The prototype Thrustcycle SRT has all three of its wheels in a straight lateral line, and utilizes a mechanical gyroscopic stabilizing system to keep it firmly upright even when standing still. That same system also stores kinetic energy generated by braking, extending the vehicle's range.  Read More

A conventional gyroscope

Earlier this year the iPhone 4 became the first smartphone to boast a built-in gyroscope in addition to an accelerometer, proximity sensor and ambient light sensor. Combining a gyroscope with an accelerometer allows the device to sense motion on six axes – left, right, up, down, forward and backward, as well as roll, pitch and yaw rotations – allowing for more accurate motion sensing abilities comparable to a game controller such as the Wii-mote. The iPhone 4 uses a MEMs (micro-electro-mechanical-systems) gyroscope but a newly developed optical gyroscope, small enough to fit on the head of a pin, could allow the integration of more accurate motion sensing technology in not only smartphones, but also in medical devices inside the human body.  Read More

The Epson Toyocom AH-6100LR is a six-axis quartz MEMS motion sensor

Epson Toyocom Corporation has produced what it claims is the world’s smallest 6-axis motion sensor. The use of motion sensors is growing dramatically, with the components found in all sorts of devices including cell phones, digital cameras, and of course game controllers such as the Nintendo Wii Remote or the Sony PlayStation Move. Epson Toyocom's AH-6100LR combines two different sensors in a single small package, incorporating both a 3-axis accelerometer and a 3-axis gyro-sensor.  Read More

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