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Guitar

Modular guitar racks designed for the living room

Many guitarists are also gear-head collectors and will likely have more than a few instruments lying about in a spare room, basement studio or loft conversion. The tidier among us may even have our most-used axes lined up and ready to rock in a guitar rack. But a rack in the living room? Unlikely. However, DRS Racks' modular storage system may just be attractive and practical enough to take center stage in the home's main living space.Read More

Music

ACPAD MIDI controller turns any acoustic guitar into an orchestra

The Acpad is the world’s first wireless MIDI controller that offers access to a variety of programmable features by simply placing it on any acoustic guitar’s surface. Without requiring any modifications, it brings hundreds of instruments, effects, samples and loops to the player’s fingertips. Set up by its standalone software or coupled with most popular digital audio workstations, the Acpad’s only limit is the player’s imagination.

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Fretlocks let you capo single strings

Guitarists use a capo to raise the pitch of an instrument but still play familiar chord shapes and fingerings. But what if you don't want all the strings to change pitch or want a different starting point for each string? You could get on the waiting list for Ben Ryan's CapoSonic, or get busy on your fingerboard installing some Fretlocks.Read More

Music

Double Flux Guitar pulls apart to become two singles

There are few visuals that sum up the essence of rock guitar better than an image of the legendary Jimmy Page aiming the headstocks of his doubleneck Gibson EDS-1275 skyward. It's just badass cool. Imagine how much more entertaining your extended Stairway to Heaven tribute would be, though, if you could snap off the lower part of the weighty doubleneck hanging from your shoulders, perform some 12-string magic with just the top half and then pop it back on for the solo. That's essentially what the Flux Guitar will allow players to do, though there's no requirement to learn Led Zeppelin's back catalog to use it.Read More

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Analog and digital worlds collide in the Fusion Guitar

One of the best sounding travel guitars we've tried is Yamaha's Silent Guitar, which offers a choice of modeled simulated tones or piezo-sourced sounds routed to headphones or an external amp. It doesn't have its own amp and speakers built-in though, like, say, a Vox Apache. And there's no Lineage-like smartphone integration to mix in some digital effects. In fact, you might struggle to find all three in one instrument. Unless you stumble across the Fusion Guitar from Melbourne, Australia-based designer and guitarist Dave Auld, which combines an iPhone dock, amplifier, battery and speakers in one futuristic-looking axe.Read More

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Guitar-Jo brings banjo sound to electric guitar

One of the most memorable moments in the 1972 film Deliverance is the banjo/guitar duel of Billy Redden and Ronny Cox. Musicians looking to add some of that plucky magic to their own compositions could nip out and buy a banjo and lock themselves away while learning to play. They may choose to follow the lead of Bow Thayer and create a new hybrid instrument. Or they could seek some digital emulation wizardry. After being unsatisfied with the latter, guitarist Jon Langberg came up with another way. The Guitar-Jo accessory gives an electric six-string an identity crisis by making it sound like a banjo.Read More

Music

Jumbo and Shorty plug up guitar's soundhole for improved tone

Players wanting to change the sound or timbre of an acoustic guitar, or just clear up any nasty tone issues or feedback, can look to digital processing or post-production for help. But Keeler Sound's Performer Series sound processors for nylon and steel string instruments make use of pipes and ports for the promise of an as-the-music-happens "perfectly balanced tone." Swapping out a unit's diaphragm, or not using one at all, will also alter the tone of the guitar.Read More

Music

Gizmotron 2.0 brings a bow to your axe

Some time around 1973, Kevin Godley and Lol Creme, then members of British pop/rock group 10cc, invented a device for guitar and bass that brought a bowing sound to selected strings when a key or keys were pressed. The Gizmotron, or Gizmo for short, was famously used by Jimmy Page on the intro to In the Evening on Led Zeppelin's In Through the Out Door and went on to make its public debut at NAMM 1979. But it was not a commercial success due to its rather temperamental nature. Now over 40 years later, the Gizmo has been revised and revived, with version 2.0 due for release by the end of 2015.Read More

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