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Greenhouse

Energy

Carbon dioxide from the air converted into methanol

The danger posed by rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide has seen many schemes proposed to remove a proportion it from the air. Rather than simply capture this greenhouse gas and bury it in the ground, though, many experiments have managed to transform CO2 into useful things like carbon nanofibers or even fuels, such as diesel. Unfortunately, the over-arching problem with many of these conversions is the particularly high operating temperatures that require almost counterproductive amounts of energy to produce relatively low yields of fuel. Now researchers at the University of Southern California (USC) claim to have devised a way to take CO2 directly from the air and convert it into methanol using much lower temperatures and in a correspondingly simpler way.Read More

Architecture

Greenhouse sprouts legs to combat flooding

When Middlesex, UK, home owners Erica and Peter suffered their fifth flood in 2014, they had to do something. Deciding that they loved their River Thames-based home far too much to move, the couple commissioned architecture firm BAT Studio to build a greenhouse that could double-up as a flood-proof safe place to store their belongings.Read More

Environment

NASA takes climate change study to the air

With the goal of shedding more light on a number of Earth system processes whose effect on our climate is incompletely understood, NASA will this year launch five new airborne field campaigns. These studies will look at long-range air pollution, warming ocean waters, melting Greenland glaciers, greenhouse gas sources, fires in Africa and clouds over the Atlantic, with the captured data to complement satellite- and surface-based observations to help provide a better understanding of the interconnected systems that affect our climate and how it is changing.Read More

Around The Home

Plantui Plantation gives the smart garden room to grow

Harsh, cold winters and scarce arable land make growing crops a challenge in Finland. A team of entrepreneurs hailing from the icy nordic nation believe this gives them a certain authority when it comes to growing crops indoors. Launched on Indiegogo yesterday, the team's Plantui Plantation hydroponic smart garden is aimed at giving urban green thumbs the capability to raise almost any kind of plant indoors, up two meters (6.6 ft) in height.Read More

Architecture

Floating off-grid greenhouse can feed two families

Italian design office Studiomobile has teamed up with the University of Florence's Professor Stefano Mancuso, who is the director of the International Laboratory of Plant Neurobiology, to produce a prototype floating greenhouse in a bid to improve food security in areas with little arable land. The Jellyfish Barge operates off-grid and produces its own clean water via an onboard system of solar distillation. Read More

Around The Home

Open source greenhouse enables smartphone control of a veggie garden

Between potting parsley, curating coriander and tending to tomatoes, a vegetable patch requires a fair amount of work and even more know how. But what if you could call on an online community to keep everything in in working order when you hit the limits of your gardening prowess? The MEG Open Source Greenhouse is an internet-connected indoor microclimate designed to tap into the collective knowledge of green-thumbs around the world.Read More

Around The Home

Origami-like mini-greenhouse lets urbanites grow their own microgreens

Once thought of as an urban hippy fad, the concept of growing produce in the inner-city has started to become more of an accepted idea. Not only does it give urban gardeners the chance to get in touch with their inner farmer, but it also helps supplement the vegetable portion of the daily diet. For Infarm, the idea of grow-your-own comes in the form of a small, origami-like greenhouse, specifically designed to grow tiny baby greens known as microgreens. Read More

Architecture

A warm little bubble for your back garden

Those of us living in the Northern Hemisphere may be mourning the end of summer, and with it the diminishing prospects of enjoying much warmth until next year. However, the Invisible Garden House, by Danish designer Simon Hjermind Jensen, may offer an opportunity to receive a regular dose of Vitamin D, even well into the colder seasons. Read More

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