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GPS


— Robotics

Engineering students build robot capable of creating theoretically infinite WiFi network

In a little over a decade WiFi has flourished to become something that we take for granted every time we go to a coffee shop. The only problem is that in situations where WiFi would be most useful, such as on the battlefield or in a disaster areas, it’s least likely to be available. That’s the problem being tackled by a team of seven undergraduate students at Northeastern University in Boston, MA. As part of their senior project for the Northeastern’s Capstone design program, the team designed and built a robot that can enter rugged territory and create a theoretically infinite WiFi networks as it goes. Read More
— Electronics

Garmin's first outdoor GPS watch includes advanced navigation features

Garmin signals its entrance into the outdoors GPS watch segment with the fēnix. Despite its annoying punctuation and emphasis baggage, the watch appears to be a fully featured and functional wrist top for the outdoors set. More than just a watch with a GPS chip, Garmin sees the fēnix as a hands-free navigation solution. Unlike its existing GPS sports watches, the Fenix (we've humored Garmin long enough) offers a more robust feature set that will navigate you into and out of the wild. Read More
— Mobile Technology

BAE takes on GPS with NAVSOP radio positioning system

By listening to the complexity of radio signals that pervades the human environment, BAE Systems thinks its new positioning system is as accurate as, but more secure than, GPS. Because its Navigation via Signals of Opportunity (NAVSOP) system uses a wide range of signals such as Wi-Fi signals and radio and TV broadcasts, it's resistant to the jamming or spoofing of individual signals to which GPS is vulnerable. Read More
— Mobile Technology

UnLoc app uses “invisible” landmarks for precise indoor localization

The commercialization of GPS technology has been a boon for those navigating unfamiliar city streets, highways and byways, but head inside out of sight of the GPS satellite signals and the limitations of the technology can quickly become evident. Other efforts to solve the problem involve the use of accelerometers, sometimes combined with magnetic field sensors, but a new system developed at Duke University promises to provide precise indoor localization using a different approach – detecting “invisible” landmarks. Read More

"DIY streetview" emulates Google's panoramic vistas

Google Street View, which offers street-level imagery of towns and cities around the world, is one of those innovations that we now take for granted, but we really shouldn't. It's easy to forget how innovative the effort is, and what a large-scale mission Google has undertaken in attempting to map the whole world. The technology exists for us all to create our own 360-degree panoramic vistas of the places around us, and DIY streetview is a kit containing everything one needs to get started. Read More
— Bicycles

SpyBike GPS Tracker is like LoJack for bikes

The National Bike Registry tells us that thousands of bikes are stolen every day in the United States alone, estimating a cost of around US$200 million per year. A stolen bike can take hundreds or thousands of dollars out of your pocket, leave you without a means of transit and turn into a frustrating, angering experience. The SpyBike Covert Bicycle GPS Tracker protects you from theft by tracking down your bike. Read More
— Bicycles

Aston Martin partners with Factor Bikes on "world's most technologically advanced road bicycle"

The Aston Martin One-77 is the sports car maker's most advanced, expensive model ever. In fact, at times it's been the most expensive new car in the world. While the car itself has sold out, Aston Martin has teamed up with bicycle manufacturer Factor Bikes to offer buyers a two-wheeled version. Not just any bike would be fit to carry the name, and the parties call the One-77 "the world's most technologically advanced road bicycle ever." Read More
— Sports

Bia sports watch made specifically for women adds à la carte GPS

GPS watches already come in all shapes and sizes (at least if you consider "heavy, square brick" and "massive discus" all shapes and sizes). Now they have a gender. The new Bia sports watch claims to be the first GPS sports watch designed for women, by women. In addition to bringing a little estrogen to a testosterone-dominated market, the watch adds a slim form factor, a separate GPS-GSM unit and a smart set of features. Read More
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