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— Science

Spire plans to use tiny satellites for more accurate weather forecasts

Weather forecasting is a notoriously inexact science. According to San Francisco-based tech startup Spire, this is partially because there are currently less than 20 satellites responsible for gathering all of the world's weather data – what's more, some of the older ones are using outdated technology. Spire's solution? Establish a linked network of over 100 shoebox-sized CubeSats, that will use GPS technology to gather 100 times the amount of weather data than is currently possible. The first 20 of those satellites are scheduled to launch later this year. Read More
— Space

ESA ATV tests new docking technology

The European Space Agency's (ESA) Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) Georges Lemaitre captured the International Space Station (ISS) in a new light in August, as it fired up a set of experimental sensors that may form the basis of the next generation of automated docking systems. Such tech will be vital for the increasingly-ambitious missions planned by NASA and its partners to explore the Red Planet and beyond. Read More
— Science

GPS satellites to aid in hunt for elusive dark matter

Dark matter is hypothesized to account for the large amounts of "missing" invisible matter in the universe where visible objects such as stars, gas, and dust are insufficient to explain the total gravitational effects observed. Despite repeated and verifiable observational evidence supporting this hypothesis, the existence of dark matter remains unproven. However, recent research has suggested that the hunt for this elusive substance may be aided by detecting any changes in the synchronization between the individual atomic clocks on-board satellites in the orbiting GPS network and receivers on the ground as waves of dark matter pass between them and the surface of the Earth. Read More
— Sports

Review: GolfBuddy PT4 handheld GPS

Gone are the days when judging the distance to the green involved looking about for a 150-yard marker, squinting down the fairway and saying "that's about an 8 iron." Technology has transformed the game of golf, not just in terms of carbon fiber shafts and remote control carts, but also in navigating your way around the course. One of the latest GPS navigation devices to hit the market is the GolfBuddy PT4. We headed out onto the links to see how it performs. Read More
— Science

Empa invents chemical computer faster than a satnav

If you’re going out for pizza in Budapest, which would you choose to get you there; a smartphone with GPS or a drop of gel on a little maze? A team of scientists from Switzerland, Hungary, Japan and Scotland under the leadership of Empa, the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, thinks that the gel might be your better bet because that little bit of plastic and goo is a chemical computer capable of navigating a maze faster than a satnav. Read More
— Good Thinking

SightCompass uses Bluetooth beacons to inform visually impaired of their surroundings

With their GPS capabilities and navigation apps, smartphones have undoubtedly made it easier for us to find our way around. The good news is we are starting to see these benefits extended to the visually impaired. SightCompass is a system that harnesses these strengths of the smartphone and combines them with proximity beacons to inform blind people of their surroundings. Read More
— Computers

LocName gives your address a URL

Repeatedly typing out addresses to share via email can be time-consuming, especially if they are written in a foreign language. A new service wants to make the need to type out addresses a thing of the past. LocName allows users to create a URL for an address that can then be easily shared. Read More