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Glue

— Around The Home

Bondic takes a "light" approach to sticking things together

By - December 5, 2014 2 Pictures
Perhaps you've had one or more of the following experiences when trying to stick items together using super glue: the glue sets before the objects can be properly aligned, it won't set fast enough, or it hardens inside the bottle once it's been opened. Well, Bondic is claimed to have none of those problems. It's described as a "liquid plastic welder" that sets within four seconds, but only once it's been exposed to an included UV light. Read More
— Science

Shellfish proteins inspire waterproof wonderglue

By - September 23, 2014 1 Picture
Clingy barnacles might be something of a nuisance for seafarers, but these stubborn shellfish and their relatives could hold the key to a new breed of sticky materials. Engineers from MIT have created waterproof adhesives based on the proteins that give these creatures such qualities, a development that could one day be used in ship repairs or medical applications. Read More
— Science

New discovery could pave the way for glues that stick like barnacles

By - July 18, 2014 1 Picture
If you place pretty much any type of solid material in the ocean, barnacles will firmly attach themselves to it. If you were to try applying a glue to any of those materials while they were underwater, however, it likely wouldn't stick. So, what do barnacles know that we don't? Scientists have recently discovered the answer, and it could lead to advances in human technologies. Read More
— Science

Spider-inspired discs could be the new glue

By - May 20, 2014 2 Pictures
In recent years we've seen a number of attempts at artificially replicating the strong-yet-light characteristics of spider silk. It turns out that the silk itself isn't the only thing that's inspiring scientists, however. Researchers from the University of Akron have recently created their own version of the "attachment discs" that spiders use to secure their silk fibers to surfaces, when building webs. These man-made discs could conceivably prove superior to conventional glues as a form of adhesive. Read More
— Environment

Zeolite-based wood glues shown to absorb pollutants off-gassed from particleboard

By - January 14, 2011 1 Picture
It has been estimated that up to 85 percent of all wood materials (such as particleboard or plywood) contain adhesives that in turn contain formaldehyde, and the World Health Organization has classified formaldehyde as a carcinogen. Unfortunately, it’s not enough to simply avoid eating those wood products – even the fumes given off by formaldehyde have been shown to pose a health hazard. Many people turn to keeping spider plants in their homes or offices, as they help neutralize airborne toxins, but now help could be coming from another source. German researchers have discovered that by adding special minerals to wood adhesives, those adhesives themselves can help clean the air. Read More
— Environment

Tofu ingredient used to create formaldehyde-free plywood glue

By - August 27, 2010 1 Picture
Two thousand years ago Jesus may have walked on water, but soon we may be walking on food. In a bid to become more environmentally sustainable, scientists have unveiled a new "green" alternative to commonly used petroleum-based wood adhesives. Representatives from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Products Laboratory in Wisconsin, speaking at this week's 240th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, talked about the development of a soy-based glue. The substance is derived from food products such as soy milk and tofu, and could mean a new generation of eco-friendly flooring, furniture, cabinets and other wood products. Read More
— Science

New environmentally benign adhesive for pressure sensitive tape developed

By - July 12, 2010 1 Picture
It happens often in research. While looking for one thing, scientists stumble across another. In this case, researchers at Oregon State University's College of Forestry were looking for an elusive wood-based adhesive that would be solid at room temperature but melt when the heat was turned up. What they stumbled upon was an easily produced, environmentally benign, pressure sensitive adhesive which holds the potential to be cheaply produced from a wide range of vegetable oils. Read More
— Science

Heat-resistant glue solves sticky problem for architects

By - January 28, 2010 1 Picture
Could you confidently gallivant under huge mushroom-like structures knowing that they had been glued – not bolted – together? The architects and engineers of the “Parasols” in Seville, Spain, certainly hope so because the design features components that are stuck to each other in such a way. Understandably, they say the biggest problem was finding a glue that could withstand 60°C (140°F) and therefore wouldn’t melt in Seville’s summer heat. This is a fairly important criterion for the free-standing parasols that cover an area of 150m x 70m - one of the largest architectural timber structures ever built. Researchers from the Fraunhofer Institute for Wood Research WKI in Germany have adhered to the challenge and stuck with a formula they believe will do the job. Read More

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