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Glucose


— Health and Wellbeing

Producing insulin-secreting pancreas cells from skin cells gives hope to diabetics

Type 1 diabetics suffer from a lack of beta cells in the pancreas, which are responsible for insulin production. Although glucose monitoring and insulin injections allows the disease to be managed, finding a way to replenish these beta cells would offer a more permanent solution. Scientists at Gladstone Institutes in San Francisco have provided hope for just such a treatment by developing a technique to reprogram skin cells into insulin-producing beta cells. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Google announces glucose-monitoring contact lens prototype

While we have seen the technology behind glucose-monitoring contact lenses develop over the least few years, getting them out of the lab and onto the eyes of diabetes sufferers has been a different story. With Google announcing its testing of a smart contact lens designed to measure glucose levels in tears, the search giant is looking to provide more effective management of the disease. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Injectable nanoparticles maintain normal blood-sugar levels for up to 10 days

Aside from the inconvenience of injecting insulin multiple times a day, type 1 diabetics also face health risks if the dosage level isn’t accurate. A new approach developed by US researchers has the potential to overcome both of these problems. The method relies on a network of nanoscale particles that once injected into the body, can maintain normal blood sugar levels for more than a week by releasing insulin when blood-sugar levels rise. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Tiny biosensor could mean an end to daily finger sticks for diabetics

Despite promising developments in recent years, millions of type-1 diabetes sufferers worldwide still face the often-painful daily burden of finger sticks to test their blood glucose levels. Now researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Microelectronic Circuits and Systems (IMS) have developed a biosensor that provides a non-invasive way to measure blood glucose levels and can transmit its readings wirelessly to a mobile device. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Chemical that slows down the biological clock could lead to new drugs to treat diabetes

Scientists have long suspected that metabolic disorders, such as type 2 diabetes and obesity, could be linked to our circadian rhythm or biological clock. For example, laboratory mice with altered biological clocks often become obese and develop diabetes. Now biologists at UC San Diego have discovered that a chemical, which affects the activity of a key protein that regulates our biological clock, can repress the production of glucose by the liver, offering a promising new direction for the development of a new class of drugs to treat diabetes. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Tiny implantable fuel cell harvests energy from the brain

A new implantable fuel cell that harvests the electrical power from the brain promises to usher in a new generation of bionic implants. Designed by MIT researchers, it uses glucose within the cerebrospinal fluid surrounding the brain to generate several hundred microwatts of power without causing any detrimental effects to the body. The technology may one day provide a whole new level of reliability and self-efficiency for all sorts of implantable brain-machine interfaces that would otherwise have to rely on external power sources. If proven harmless, the method could be used to power implants that could, among other things, help the paralyzed regain the ability to walk. Read More

Can starch fibers solve the bandage conundrum?

Should you rip it off fast or slow? Researchers at Penn State may have found the elusive third, painless option. Professor Greg Ziegler and research assistant Lingyan Kong have developed a process that spins starch into fine strands, creating fibers that could be woven into low-cost toilet paper, napkins and biodegradable bandages that don't need to be ripped off at all. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Biochip that measures glucose in saliva could mean an end to finger-pricking for diabetics

In order to measure their blood glucose levels, most diabetics must perform painful finger-prick tests on a daily basis. Hopefully, however, that may not always be the case. Scientists at Rhode Island’s Brown University are now developing a biochip, that could someday be used to assess the concentration of glucose molecules in a tiny sample of saliva. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Naturally occurring compound helps reverse diabetes in mice

Researchers at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have reversed diabetes in mice using a compound that is made naturally in the body. After diabetic mice were given the naturally occurring compound, called nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), their normal blood sugar metabolism was restored. The researchers say their findings suggest it might one day be possible for people to take the compound like a daily vitamin to treat or prevent type 2 diabetes. Read More
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