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Glucose


— Science

Researchers produce hydrogen quickly and cheaply using plant waste

By - April 9, 2015 1 Picture
Hydrogen is the ideal gas for use in low-emissions combustion engine or fuel cell-powered vehicles, due to its almost non-existent greenhouse gas emissions. Production costs, however, are higher compared to gasoline and around 95 percent of it is currently produced, somewhat counter-intuitively, from fossil fuels. Now researchers at Virginia Tech claim to have created a method to produce hydrogen fuel using a biological technique that is not only cheaper and faster, but also produces hydrogen of a much higher quality ... and all from the leftover stalks, cobs, and husks of corn. Read More
— Medical

MRI-based cancer detection technique could replace biopsies

By - March 30, 2015 2 Pictures
While non-invasive imaging technologies, such as mammograms or CT scans, are capable of detecting tumors, identifying whether they are malignant or benign usually involves getting out the scalpel and conducting a biopsy. Now researchers at Johns Hopkins University have developed a technique that uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to noninvasively detect cancerous cells, offering the potential of supplementing biopsies or maybe one day replacing them altogether. Read More
— Medical

Saccharin could sweeten the deal for cancer-fighting drugs

By - March 23, 2015 1 Picture
Whether it be advice from a dentist or preparing their body for beach season, there's a host of reasons people might reach for an artificial sweetener rather than sugar – though its cancer-fighting properties are unlikely to be one of them. But new research shows that the common sugar substitute known as saccharin could hamper the growth of particular cancers, with scientists claiming it could form the basis for new kinds of drug treatments. Read More
— Medical

Hormone combo a triple threat to obesity and adult-onset diabetes

By - December 11, 2014 2 Pictures
In 2012, we covered work led by Professor Richard DiMarchi that showed linking two hormones into a single molecule held promise as a treatment for obesity. DiMarchi followed this up last year by combining the properties of two endocrine hormones to provide an effective treatment for both obesity and adult-onset diabetes. Continuing in this vein, DiMarchi has now co-led a study whereby obesity and diabetes were effectively cured in lab animals by adding a third hormone to the molecular mix. Read More
— Medical

Single injection reverses type 2 diabetes symptoms in mice without side effects

By - August 6, 2014 1 Picture
There are numerous research efforts underway to develop new treatments and improve the lives of people suffering type 2 diabetes, whose ranks have increased dramatically in recent decades due in large part to the so-called obesity epidemic. A new generation of safer and more effective diabetes drugs could be in the offing with researchers at the Salk Institute discovering that when mice with diet-induced diabetes were given a single injection of a protein, their blood sugar levels were restored to a healthy range for more than two days. Read More
— Medical

Device for detecting glucose levels in saliva comes a step closer

By - June 18, 2014 1 Picture
Two years ago, we first heard about how scientists at Rhode Island's Brown University were developing a biochip for detecting very low concentrations of glucose in saliva. Such a device could make life much easier for diabetics, as it would save them from having to perform fingerprick blood tests. At the time, it was limited to detecting glucose in water. Now, however, it's able to do so within a mixture of water, salts and select enzymes – also known as artificial saliva. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Producing insulin-secreting pancreas cells from skin cells gives hope to diabetics

By - February 6, 2014 1 Picture
Type 1 diabetics suffer from a lack of beta cells in the pancreas, which are responsible for insulin production. Although glucose monitoring and insulin injections allows the disease to be managed, finding a way to replenish these beta cells would offer a more permanent solution. Scientists at Gladstone Institutes in San Francisco have provided hope for just such a treatment by developing a technique to reprogram skin cells into insulin-producing beta cells. Read More
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