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Glasses

— Health and Wellbeing

OrCam aims to improve quality of life for the visually impaired

By - June 5, 2013 5 Pictures
The OrCam is a small camera linked to a very powerful wearable computer. It sees what you see and through your finger-pointing understands what information you seek, relaying auditory feedback through a bone conduction earpiece. Using an intuitive user interface, the device can read text, recognize faces, identify objects and places, locate bus numbers and even monitor traffic lights. Read More

Vinylize makes glasses from platters that matter

Vinyl isn't dead! Or so hipsters and audiophiles the world over will tell you. They're entitled to their opinion but I, like most of the world, now prefer my music stored in digital form. Unfortunately, this means lots of vinyl records are heading for landfill, which isn't good for any of us. So why not upcycle old vinyl records into something that's still useful? Something like glasses. Read More

DropShades: Sound-reactive sunglasses brighten up the party

If you're the person at a party who likes to be noticed, then donning a pair of sunglasses which react to sound may be just what you've always wanted. Such a thing now exists, at least in prototype form, with DropShades taking the Kanye West-style shutter shades design and adding multi-colored LED lights to the equation. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

O2Amps glasses designed to help read peoples’ emotions find other applications

By - February 15, 2013 10 Pictures
Along with facial expressions, tell-tale variations in facial blood flow that causes reddening and whitening of the skin can also give an indication of people's emotions. To take advantage of this, 2AI Labs developed a special pair of glasses designed to enhance a person's color vision to better enable them to perceive the oxygenation and hemoglobin variations in another person's face, and thus their emotional state. The glasses are now finding a variety of applications, from medical to security. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

meta AR glasses to offer gesture control of 3D virtual objects

By - January 31, 2013 7 Pictures
It’s been a staple of science fiction for decades, but now the idea of augmented reality (AR) enhancing our lives by way of hi-tech wearable glasses is finally becoming a reality for consumers. Google's Project Glass may be getting the lion's share of attention, but prototypes and new ventures abound with any number of goggle-like devices offering immersive 3D gaming through to simply capturing your everyday life for sharing online. Now a start-up called meta has joined the fray, partnering with Epson to create AR glasses that allow virtual objects to be controlled in 3D space using hand gestures. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

Re-Timer resets body clock to counter jet lag

By - November 20, 2012 3 Pictures
It’s taken a few years, but the LED light glasses developed at Australia’s Flinders University that first attracted our attention back in 2003 are finally seeing a commercial launch. Now called Re-Timer, the wearable device emits a soft green light onto the eyes to reset the body’s internal clock to counter jet lag, improve the alertness of shift workers and make waking up in the morning easier. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

OLED data glasses controlled with eye movements

By - November 2, 2012 1 Picture
Imagine that you’re a mechanic whose hands are covered in grease, and you’re trying to follow repair instructions. Every time you need to turn the page or advance the screen, you have to put down your tools and wipe your hands. That’s why scientists from the Fraunhofer Center for Organics, Materials and Electronic Devices Dresden (COMEDD) have developed glasses that allow the wearer to flip pages on a digital document using nothing but their eyes. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

EnChroma glasses designed to compensate for color-blindness

By - September 17, 2012 2 Pictures
While many people may think that being color blind means seeing everything in black-and-white, such a condition is in fact quite rare. Instead, the majority of people who are classified as color blind are capable of color vision, but they have difficulty distinguishing red and green as distinct colors. EnChroma’s Cx sunglasses are designed to help in these cases, by selectively reducing the transmission of given wavelengths of light, thus allowing red and green to stand out. Read More
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