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Glass

Science

Smart Glass controls both lighting and heat levels

Researchers at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have produced a "smart" glass coating that can be selectively controlled to block visible light, heat-producing near-infrared (NIR) light, or both, by applying a small electrical charge to it. The ability to do this dynamically has the potential to deliver improved lighting, heating, and cooling efficiency in buildings, thereby maximizing energy savings and still providing bright and well lit environments in different weather conditions.Read More

Science

Super-slippery SLIPS coating now transparent and more durable

Joanna Aizenberg, Ph.D. and her team at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University have improved upon the Slippery Liquid-Infused Porous Surfaces (SLIPS) technology they developed back in 2012. The ultra smooth surface, which the team claims is the slipperiest known synthetic surface, has now been made transparent and more durable, giving it the potential to make the issues glass has with sticky liquids, frost and ice formation, and bacterial biofilms a thing of the past. Read More

Offline Glass combats unsociable smartphone addiction

It’s a bit ironic that a device whose primary purpose is communication is responsible for so much unsociable behavior. The Offline Glass offers one way of combating unsocial smartphone use by preventing smartphone addicts from choosing their gadget du jour over their friends and significant others. Read More

Sugar-filled Solarium would tempt Hansel and Gretel

William Lamson's Solarium comes close to a real-life equivalent of the gingerbread and cake house described in classic fairy tale Hansel and Gretel. Though it uses steel instead of confectionary as a means of support, Lamson's creation incorporates caramelized sugar to create an effect similar to stained-glass windows.Read More

Around The Home

Sonte Film controls a window's opacity with a smartphone

Smart glass has become a popular fixture in homes and offices for its ability to change between transparent and opaque, depending on whether an electric current is applied. It's a handy invention, but also tends to be expensive to install and offers only limited control. Sonte is hoping to change that with an affordable window film that connects wirelessly to a smartphone app to instantly turn any section of glass from clear to solid at the press of a button.Read More
Architecture

Hiroshima's Optical Glass House constructed using 6,000 glass bricks

Architecture studio Hiroshi Nakamura & NAP has designed the “Optical Glass House” in Hiroshima, Japan, that aims to acoustically protect residents from the main road outside, whilst providing light and views for the residents within. The delicate glass blocks belie the structure and a complex casting process is employed to create the 13 ton (11.7 tonne) facade that shows-off the buildings tree-filled courtyard and looks like a shimmering waterfall to the outside world.Read More

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