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Gesture Recognition

The system use 3D cameras to detect and record gestures

Quality control is a vital part of modern manufacturing. Not only does it decrease the chances of a dissatisfied customer, but it reduces waste and, therefore, cost. However, inspecting products on the assembly line can itself be expensive, time consuming, and not as accurate as it should be. To speed things up a bit, BMW has developed a new system for inspecting bumpers that uses gestures to allow inspectors to literally point out defects.  Read More

A squiggly line like this may be more secure than your PIN

Many of us now use our mobile devices for things like online banking, in crowded public places ... the sort of places where it would be easy for sometime to sneak a peek as we enter our passcodes. Researchers from New Jersey's Rutgers University, however, are working on a possible alternative to those typed codes. They've discovered that passwords consisting of hand gestures used to draw free-form lines on a smartphone or tablet screen are much more difficult for "shoulder surfers" to copy after seeing.  Read More

A user zooms in on a map by pinching their fingers on the keyboard

Gesture recognition devices may indeed offer more functionality than is possible using just a keyboard and mouse, but in order to use them, users have to lift their hands up and away from that keyboard. A team at Microsoft Research decided to address that problem, and created a prototype mechanical keyboard that recognizes hand gestures performed on or immediately above the keys.  Read More

Ring's gesture recognition is precise enough to identify letters written in mid air

We've already seen rings that unlock doors and mobile devices, show the time, act as a mouse or display notifications from a connected mobile device, but, like the Fin, the Ring from California-based Logbar aims to take finger wagging to the next level. Featuring Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) connectivity, the Ring is designed to allow control of mobile devices and home appliances, make electronic payments and even type text in mid air with a wave of a finger.  Read More

The AllSee prototype developed at the University of Washington allows gestures to be detec...

Current gesture recognition technology seen in devices such as Samsung's Galaxy S4 generally rely on the device's camera. This not only creates a drain on the device's battery, but means users need to retrieve the phone from their pocket or handbag to make use of the technology. The new AllSee system developed at the University of Washington (UW) overcomes both these problems by using wireless signals not only as a power source, but also to detect user gestures when the phone is tucked away out of sight.  Read More

A display shows sign language interpreted into written words

Two Portuguese designers based in Sydney have come up with a practical idea for facilitating communication between people when sign language is involved. Catarina Araujo and Sofia Santos’ project, still at the development stage and looking for financial backers, taps Leap Motion technology to create a wearable sign language translator to be worn as a necklace.  Read More

Gizmag goes hands-on with the Creative Senz3D at IFA

Creative is taking on the might of Microsoft's Kinect with the Senz3D Interactive Gesture Camera. Marketed as the "future of PC interaction," the Senz3D features advanced depth sensor technology, and dual array microphones for voice recognition. Gizmag was on the scene to take it for a brief whirl.  Read More

Aireal is a new haptic technology from Disney Research

With systems like the Kinect and Leap Motion, controlling a gadget with just the wave of a hand is starting to become much more commonplace. The one drawback to those gesture-based devices however is that you never actually touch anything. No matter what you see on the screen, you're still very aware that you're just moving your hands through the air. The Pittsburg branch of Disney Research may be able to change that with Aireal, a low-cost haptic system which fires out small rings of air that allow people to feel virtual objects.  Read More

A WiSee user could control their TV using gestures, even if a wall separated them and the ...

By now, even if they’ve never used one themselves, most people are pretty familiar with the idea behind gesture control systems such as the Kinect – the user makes a movement, the device “sees” that movement, and interprets it. However, what would happen if the user was in another room, blocked from the device’s cameras and depth sensors? Well, as long as there was a Wi-Fi signal available, it wouldn’t be a problem ... at least, not if the WiSee system was being used.  Read More

The next-gen Kinect for Windows sensor boasts improved image fidelity

The Xbox One may have hogged the spotlight, but the next-gen console wasn’t the only piece of new hardware Microsoft unveiled this past week. The company also announced a next generation version of its Kinect for Windows sensor. Built around the same set of technologies as the Xbox One’s new Kinect sensor, the new Kinect for Windows sensor and software development kit (SDK) are aimed more at businesses and organizations than individual consumers.  Read More

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