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Gesture Control


— Home Entertainment

InAiR displays internet content "in the air" between you and your 3D TV

Are you one of those people who keep your TV and computer on at the same time, simultaneously watching the one while looking things up on the other? If so, you might like SeeSpace's new InAiR Augmented TV system. In the case of a regular 2D television, it superimposes layered internet content over top of the existing picture, allowing you to view both at once. And if you've got a 3D TV, those layers appear to be floating in the space between you and the screen, zooming towards or away from you as selected. Read More
— Around The Home

Ninja Sphere: A one-stop intelligent Internet of Things platform for the home

Wouldn't it be nice to have a digital house elf that handles the operation of all your various electronic devices? That's what the Ninja Sphere aims to be, a one stop intelligent hub designed to add your various household devices to the Internet of Things. Like other home automation systems, such as Revolv, Ninja Sphere can monitor and allow the remote control of connected devices, but offers expanded capabilities with its gesture control interface and the ability to map the location of devices in the home in real time. Read More
— Home Entertainment

Samsung's new Smart TVs will be controlled with a wag of your finger

It seems not even the impending holiday is stopping some of the tech industry's heavy hitters from teasing their standout products for the 2014 CES. First LG and Samsung unveiled separate 105-inch curved UHD TVs on the same day, and now Samsung is dropping some details on its Smart TVs for next year. In addition to less complicated voice commands, the company's 2014 Smart TV line will allow the use of "finger gestures" for basic controls like changing the channel, adjusting the volume, or rewinding video. Read More
— Science

WiTrack system allows for motion tracking through walls

Microsoft's Kinect system is certainly impressive, but now that we've had a chance to get used to it and start taking it for granted, it does have one problem – you have to stay located in front of it. MIT's new WiTrack system, however, can track users' movements even when those people are in another room. Among other things, this could allow for video games in which the players run all over their house. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

Nymi wristband uses your heartbeat as a password

If someone says that they want to steal your heart, be careful. They may be trying to get into your computer files. The Toronto-based biometrics company Bionym wants to replace old-fashioned passwords with Nymi; a bracelet that uses the wearer’s heartbeat in place of passwords. According to the developers, the system delivers a secure and convenient means of identification that also provides the potential to control devices using gestures. Read More
— Computers

Haptix brings 3D multitouch to any surface

Multitouch and the tablet were made for each other, but there are times when you wish your hands were transparent so you could see what's hidden beneath them. Waving digits in mid-air would appear to offer some hope of liberating your hands from the touchscreen, and certainly wins points for coolness, but hitting a precise area of nothing to activate an icon or confirm an action may well seem like way too much effort when you could just reach for a trusty mouse. The Haptix system from Ractiv combines elements of both to make any flat surface multitouch, freeing your hands from the touchscreen and making the mouse obsolete. Read More
— Computers

Type in mid-air with a Leap Motion and DexType

The news release announcing the availability of the Leap Motion controller and supporting software isn't even cold yet, and the first applications that make use of its gesture recognition capabilities are already making a break for freedom. Asetniop creator Zack Dennis has joined the fray with an alternative to the physical keyboard he's calling DexType. Essentially a Google Chrome browser plugin, the Dex-typist uses mid-air point and poke gestures to select characters from a strip at the bottom of the screen. Read More
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