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Gesture Control

Leap Motion today announced that its 3D gesture sensor will ship in May

It may not quite have the hype of Google Glass, Apple’s rumored iWatch, or the Galaxy S IV, but Leap Motion may be one of the most important technology products of 2013. The small sensor that lets you control your computer with mid-air 3D gestures now has a ship date – along with its own app store.  Read More

Thalmic Labs' MYO lets you control computers via one-armed gestures

Over the last five years, the touchscreen has supplanted the mouse and keyboard as the primary way that many of us interact with computers. But will multitouch enjoy a 30-year reign like its predecessor? Or will a newcomer swoop in and steal its crown? One up-and-comer, Thalmic Labs, hopes that the answer lies in 3D gesture control.  Read More

Researchers have created a bendable, transparent polymer that acts as an image sensor (Pho...

A research team from the Johannes Kepler University Linz in Austria has developed an image capturing device using a single sheet of polymer that is flat, flexible and transparent. The researchers say the new image sensor could eventually find its way into devices like digital cameras and medical scanners, and that it may help to usher in a new generation of gesture-controlled smartphones, tablets and TVs.  Read More

The Golden-i 3.8 headset is a wearable, hands free computer interfacing device for profess...

Back in 2009, the Kopin Corporation’s Golden-i headset promised a hands-free, natural-speech-recognition interface for wireless remote control over a range of devices including mobile phones, PCs, company networks and wireless systems, but it was also little more than a concept. Four years on, the company is marketing the wearable, hands free computer interfacing devices for heavy and light industries, professionals and first responders. The Golden-i headsets allow the user to send and receive audiovisual information from multiple platforms by means of both voice and motion control while leaving the hands free to get on with the job.  Read More

Hisense's XT900 line boasts an impressive 3840 x 2160 pixel resolution along with 120Hz pa...

China's Hisense arrived at CES 2013 with a brand new line of Ultra-LED (U-LED) XT900 televisions, which will be available in 65-, 84-, and 110-inch sizes. The company's XT900 line boasts an impressive 3,840 x 2,160 pixel resolution along with 120 Hz panels allowing for an active shutter 3D picture. The U-LED screen also incorporates local dimming technology to deliver a more dynamic contrast ratio.  Read More

Microchip Technologies has developed the world's first gesture recognition chip based on m...

The smallest gesture can hide a world of meaning. A particular flick of a baton and a beseeching gesture can transform the key moment of a concert from mundane to ethereal. Alas, computers are seriously handicapped in understanding human gestural language, both in software and hardware. In particular, finding a method for describing gestures presented to a computer as input data for further processing has proven a difficult problem. In response, Microchip Technologies has developed the world's first 3D gesture recognition chip that senses the gesture without contact, through its effect on electric fields.  Read More

panGenerator's Dodecaudion is a 12-faced music controller that can trigger audio or video ...

Moving around the stage while performing is a whole lot easier with instruments such as the Vortex or Kitara than with something like the mighty JUPITER-80. Innovations like Onyx Ashanti's Beatjazz hands or the Air Piano from Omer Yosha go even further, by making movement a vital part of the music creation process. Such is the case with the Dodecaudion from Polish art and design group panGenerator. When a performer places a hand, foot, head or other part of the body in front of any of its 12 IR-sensor-packing faces, wirelessly-linked processing hardware generates pre-programmed audio or visuals.  Read More

The Motorola HC1 is aimed at industrial and military users

Motorola Solutions has released its own head-mounted wearable computer based on Kopin Corporation’s Golden-i headset. Aimed at industrial and military users who need to keep their hands free on the job while viewing documents and schematics or getting help from far afield specialists, the Motorola HC1 Headset Computer places an 800 x 600 (SVGA) full color TFT micro-display at a viewing distance that provides a virtual image size of 15 inches. In keeping with the hands-free theme, the headset can be controlled via voice recognition and gesture controls.  Read More

Intel's close-range tracking in operation

As computers become more sophisticated, they sometimes seem almost human – especially when they refuse to download a page when you’re in a hurry. At the Intel Developer’s Forum in San Francisco, Intel revealed that it is taking that a step further by giving their new line of Ultrabooks “human-like senses to perceive the user's intentions” thanks to a new generation of processors.  Read More

The ES9000 will be sold for US$9,999 when it arrives in U.S. stores next month (ES8000 pic...

Samsung has unveiled a new flagship 75-inch television, named the ES9000 LED Smart 3D TV. While the TV sports a curved bezel of just 0.31 inches (0.78 cm) and boasts plenty of on-board features, most eyes are turned toward the game that ships with the colossal product: a gesture-controlled version of Angry Birds. Though the ES9000 enjoys the benefit of debuting the gesture-controlled game, owners of existing Samsung Smart TV's will soon also get to battle those perennially pesky critters while gesticulating wildly, as the new iteration of the title will eventually be rolled out to both the Plasma 8000 and Samsung's 2012 LED 7500, and superior, models.  Read More

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