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Fruit

FreshPaper is herb-infused paper, that is claimed to prolong the shelf life of fresh fruit...

While we all know how important it is to eat plenty of fruits and vegetables, it can often be difficult to use all that we buy before they spoil. A product known as FreshPaper, however, is claimed to keep such foods fresh two to four times longer than normal – and it does so just using spices.  Read More

The 3-in-1 Banana Split Tool has a series of plastic edges allow you to slice the banana n...

Bananas are one of the tastiest and most convenient fruits available. They're easy to carry, come with their own cover, and are sweet enough to eat without the need to be cooked or affected in any way. However, they can be a little messy, especially if they're being eaten in any way other than simply peeled and chewed. The 3-in-1 Banana Split Tool from Amco Houseworks is a cheap and cheerful addition to the arsenal of any finicky fruit fan.  Read More

Scientists have developed a hydrogel that lengthens the shelf life of bananas (Photo: Shut...

Just about everyone loves bananas, but there is one problem with the things – they have a way of becoming overripe before they can be eaten. Yesterday, however, a scientist from China’s Tianjin University of Science and Technology announced the development of a spray-on coating that is capable of keeping picked bananas fresh for almost two weeks.  Read More

Stretchy Bowl expands as needed to accommodate more fruit, all of which should stay freshe...

We're all encouraged to eat more fresh fruit - whether by parents, partners, or physicians - but it isn't always the easiest advice to follow. Fresh fruit doesn't stay fresh for long, especially if it sits in a bowl with other types of fruit that are closer to being past their best. It's also difficult to know what size of bowl you need to own in order to accommodate the differing numbers and types of fruit you are storing at any one time. Stretchy Bowl is an effort to solve both these issues.  Read More

An MIT scientist is developing inexpensive sensors that are able to gauge the ripeness of ...

As fruit matures, it releases a gas known as ethylene, that causes the ripening process to begin. Once that process is under way, more ethylene is released, kicking the ripening into high gear. Currently, produce warehouses use expensive technologies such as gas chromatography or mass spectroscopy to measure ethylene levels, in order to gauge the ripeness of fruits that are in storage. A scientist from MIT, however, is developing small, inexpensive ethylene sensors that could be used in places such as supermarkets. There, they could let shopkeepers know which batches of fruit need to sold the soonest, in order to minimize spoilage.  Read More

The pilot plant in Stuttgart that makes biogas out of waste from wholesale markets (Photo:...

Some readers might remember the Mr. Fusion unit in Back to the Future that Doc Brown fills with household garbage, including a banana peel and some beer, to power the iconic time-traveling DeLorean. While we're still some way from such direct means of running our cars on table scraps, researchers at Fraunhofer have developed a pilot plant that ferments the waste from wholesale fruit and veg markets, cafeterias and canteens to make methane, which can be used to power vehicles.  Read More

Fruitwash labels dissolve into organic fruit soap (image: Amron Exptl.)

New York based electrical engineer and designer Scott Amron has come up with an idea that could transform the way industries label fruit and vegetables. You may not pay much attention to that fruit sticker on your apple or orange - though it's often frustrating to remove - and it usually just ends up in the trash. However, Amron is a man who has put considerable thought into that sticker, creating the Fruitwash label. Just as the name suggests, the new label dissolves into organic fruit soap that helps remove water-resistant wax, pesticides and fungicides.  Read More

Spanish researchers have developed an 'electronic tongue' for analyzing the content of ant...

Not to be confused with the bizarre robotic tongue prototype, “electronic tongues” have been in use for the past several years, for assessing the content of various foods and beverages – and no, unfortunately they don’t look like actual tongues. While past examples have been used for purposes such as identifying the vintage and grape variety of wines, researchers from Spain’s Universitat Politècnica de València (UPV) have recently developed one that analyzes the content of antioxidant powder, along with fruit and fruit products.  Read More

A research team from Brazil has developed a new form of plant fiber-based plastic that is ...

A research team from Brazil has developed a new form of plant fiber-based plastic that is claimed to be stronger, lighter, and more eco-friendly than plastics currently in use. Team leader Alcides Leão says that some of the so-called nano-cellulose fibers can be almost as stiff as Kevlar, but that the plastic differs from many in widespread use because the source material – such as pineapple and banana – is completely renewable. The researchers say that current production efforts are centered around the manufacture of automotive plastics, but future development could see steel and aluminum being replaced.  Read More

Inspiration from the fruit fly could simplify how wireless sensor networks communicate

Over the years science has gleaned an enormous amount of knowledge from the humble fruit fly. Drosophila melanogaster was used to provide the post-Mendelian foundations for our understanding of genetics and has also been used extensively in neuroscience research. The latest fruit fly-inspired innovation could simplify how wireless sensor networks communicate and stands to have wider applications for computing.  Read More

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