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Fridge

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Samsung's new smart fridge lets you check in on its contents through internal cameras

With a back catalogue of fridges featuring sparkling water dispensers, independent cooling zones and touchscreens of all shapes and sizes, these days it might be more surprising if Samsung rolled in to CES without some kind of wacky refrigerator in tow. For this year's event, the Korean electronics giant has wheeled out a connected fridge with internal cameras so you can peer inside using your phone when you're out and about. After numerous false starts, could it be Samsung's Family Hub Refrigerator that earns this everyday appliance a place at the table of the Internet of Things?Read More

Molson's beer fridge that only Canadians can open

A fridge full of free beer sounds like a great thing to find sitting on a street corner, but what if you needed a Canadian to open it? That was the puzzle posed by the Rethink advertising agency on behalf of Canada’s Molson brewery. This northern spring, Rethink set up red fridges at various locations around Europe that would only open if a Canadian passport was inserted.Read More

LG debuts novel door-in-door super capacity fridge

Each time the door of a fridge is opened, cool air escapes and ambient air sneaks in. As its name might well give away, LG's new Door-in-Door French-door refrigerator has a storage compartment in the door itself, allowing users to retrieve most commonly needed items without affecting the temperature of the main storage space.Read More

Around The Home

Amplify your kitchen cool with the Marshall Fridge

Much like NAMM in the U.S., Germany's Musikmesse is a chance for the music industry to showcase both old favorites and new technology. Among the rows of classic amps on show at Marshall's booth this year is something that may look like an amp from the Jim Marshall signature series, but which is nothing of the sort. The authentic Marshall amp head and cabinet facing of the prototype Marshall Fridge open up to reveal 4.4 cubic feet (124 liters) of can or bottle chilling storage space, with handy can storage on the inside of the door and a mini freezer to feed users with a steady supply of ice cubes.Read More

Good Thinking

True Energy refrigerators cool for ten days without power

Any time there’s a prolonged power outage in warm weather, chances are that one of your first thoughts is “What’ll happen to all the food in my fridge?”. Well, imagine if instead of a week’s worth of groceries, your unpowered refrigerator was full of vaccines, vital to the well-being of an entire African village. In rural third world countries, power failures are common, as are high temperatures – not a great combination for things that need to be kept cold. Fortunately, some aid agencies have the option of using a True Energy Vaccine Refrigerator. It can store US$30,000 worth of medicine below 10C (50F) in 43C (109F) ambient temperatures, for over ten days at a time, without power.Read More

Around The Home

Electrolux Infinity I-Kitchen takes fridges open source

One of the biggest marketing miss-steps of the past decade surely has to be LG’s Internet Refrigerator that incorporated a Windows 98-based PC and 15.1-inch LCD touch display in the door, allowing users to surf the Internet for recipes, play music and videos or (theoretically) do some office work while standing at the fridge. Electrolux seems to think the world is now ready to embrace the idea and has developed an Internet fridge of its own in the form of the Linux-based Infinity I-Kitchen.Read More

Games

The Gamerator serves up arcade classics - and beer - in your home

Video games and beer – together at last! Actually, a visit to just about any college dorm or rec room will show you that video games and beer can regularly be found together, but now they’re available from the same machine. It’s called the Gamerator, and it combines a classic 80s-style video arcade machine with a mini fridge capable of holding a pony keg of beer and a five-pound aluminum CO2 tank. Bring on the blue ghosts!Read More

Around The Home

Shrinking jug keeps milk fresh for an extra week

Milk goes sour in about a week, even if you keep it in the fridge. That's because Lactobacillus, the "good bacteria" that's found in yogurt, is constantly going about the job of oxidizing the lactose sugars in the milk into sour-tasting lactic acid - the same chemical that makes your muscles sore after exercise. But since this souring process requires the presence of oxygen, theoretically it could be slowed down even further if you kept the milk out of contact with oxygen. Rather than going with a high-tech nitrous contraption like the N2Wine globes we wrote about recently, one entrant to this year's James Dyson awards has come up with something devilishly simple: a shrinking milk jug that squeezes all the air out as you empty it. The inventor claims it lets milk last as much as a week longer. Simple and brilliant!Read More

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