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Fraunhofer

— Home Entertainment

Gizmag given a glimpse of the future of TV audio

By - September 6, 2014 2 Pictures
TV picture quality has improved by leaps and bounds in recent years, with most manufacturers currently bringing Ultra High Definition beauties to market when only a short while ago HD seemed more than sufficient. Meanwhile, say researchers from Fraunhofer IIS, advances in audio playback have not been so awe-inspiring. Gizmag got the opportunity to sample a promising system under development that's based on the MPEG-H standards, which will offer listeners greater control over what they hear during TV broadcasts. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

Fraunhofer's Google Glass app detects human emotions in real time

By - August 27, 2014 1 Picture
Over a number of years, researchers at Germany's Fraunhofer Institute have developed software to measure human emotion through face detection and analysis. Dubbed SHORE (Sophisticated High-speed Object Recognition), the technology has the potential to aid communication for those with disabilities. Now the team has repurposed the software as an app for Google Glass, with a view to bringing its emotion-detecting technology to the world. Read More
— Automotive

BMW checks bumpers with the wave of a hand

By - June 24, 2014 2 Pictures
Quality control is a vital part of modern manufacturing. Not only does it decrease the chances of a dissatisfied customer, but it reduces waste and, therefore, cost. However, inspecting products on the assembly line can itself be expensive, time consuming, and not as accurate as it should be. To speed things up a bit, BMW has developed a new system for inspecting bumpers that uses gestures to allow inspectors to literally point out defects. Read More
— Medical

Miniature artificial lung could revolutionize cancer research

By - June 4, 2014 1 Picture
Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology in Germany have created a miniature artificial lung that has the potential to significantly improve the process of developing treatments for lung cancer. In addition to the possibility of replacing animal trials currently used to test new medications, the "3D-lung" could be used to expand our understanding of how lung cancer spreads to the rest of the body. Read More
— Around The Home

Fraunhofer developing fuel cell system to power the home

By - June 4, 2014 1 Picture
As the world shifts to alternative forms of energy, ways to make homes less dependent on the grid continue to gather steam. Fuel cells, which are more efficient and have lower emissions than internal combustion engines seem like a logical candidate for taking up the slack, so the Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems (IKTS) in Dresden is partnering with the heater manufacturer Vaillant to develop a domestic fuel cell system that uses natural gas to produce both heating and electricity. Read More
— Aircraft

Shape-changing wings inspire more efficient aircraft designs

By - May 24, 2014 1 Picture
We tend to think of aeronautical engineering as having left the birds standing still sometime around the First World War, but since jet fighters can’t perch and quadcopters can’t snag salmon out of a stream, we still have a few things to learn. Taking a couple of pages from the avian playbook, Fraunhofer Institute for Electronic Nano Systems (ENAS) and its partners are developing wing flaps for airplanes that change shape like a bird’s wing for greater efficiency. Read More
— Science

First fundamentally new lubricant in decades created from liquid crystals

By - May 22, 2014 1 Picture
The world uses tens of millions of tons of lubricant every year, from the smallest part of a micro-precision instrument to the expansion rollers on the largest bridges. Most are oil based, though others use powders, and even metals, and it’s been that way for decades. That could be changing as the Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials, Nematel GmbH, and Dr. Tillwich GmbH have developed a new class of lubricants that are based on liquid crystals instead of oil. According to Fraunhofer, this is the first fundamentally new lubricant developed in twenty years. Read More
— Science

Shape-changing mirror puts lasers in focus

By - May 14, 2014 1 Picture
One cinematic cliché we've all seen is when the hero deflects the villain's dastardly laser beam with a hastily snatched hand mirror, sending it back at his adversary. Physics, ever the wet blanket, says that this is a highly improbable scenario. Focusing high-powered lasers isn't easy. A powerful laser distorts the mirror, throwing the beam off and spreading it out uselessly. To combat this, Fraunhofer is developing a lens that can deform itself to compensate for heating and other distortion factors to keep lasers focused on target. Read More
— Robotics

Snake-like robot to help automate aircraft wing construction

By - May 4, 2014 1 Picture
Although modern jet airliners may be at the cutting edge of technology, assembling them is, in many ways, still as much of a craft as 18th century shipbuilding, requiring loads of skill and manual labor to get the job done. The Fraunhofer Institute for Machine Tools and Forming Technology (IWU) in Chemnitz, Germany wants to bring airplane construction into the 21st century with a snake-like robot that can assemble airplane wings by reaching into narrow, hard to reach cavities. Read More
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