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— Military

Lemur Studio Design develops mine detector in a shoe

Boot insoles can turn a pair of really uncomfortable brogues into podiatric clouds that can take a long hike and remove the foot ache. Now, Lemur Studio Design based in Bogota, Colombia, has come up with a concept for insoles that won’t just save your instep, but could save your life. A submission to the World Design Impact Prize 2013-2014 competition, SaveOneLife is a wearable mine detector that fits in a shoe and warns the wearer if and where a potentially deadly landmine might lurk nearby. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

Digital positioning shoes keep track of firefighters

Disorientation inside smoke-filled and unfamiliar buildings can be a major obstacle for firefighters – and it's not as if they don't have enough to worry about already. Researchers at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm have addressed this problem by developing fancy footwear that allows firefighters to be tracked in places where GPS fails, including up to 25 m below ground. Read More
— Sports

Smart shoe to improve jogging technique on the run

Given its accessibility to anyone with two feet, jogging is one of the most popular forms of fitness activity around the world, with around 10 million people in Germany alone donning their running shoes and hitting the pavement on a regular basis, according to the Fraunhofer Institute for Photonic Microsystems (IPMS). However, this popularity also translates into a large number of jogging-related injuries. In an effort to reduce the number of injuries, a research team from IPMS is developing a high-tech running shoe with the ability to evaluate a jogger's running form and technique in real-time. Read More
— Outdoors Review

Review: ThermaCELL Heated Insoles

ThermaCELL released its wirelessly-controlled Heated Insoles in 2012, and I've been wondering about them ever since. A local store couldn't keep the things in stock last winter, yet I've also seen more than a few user reviews stating that they just don't work. Given that I live somewhere where cold toes are a common problem for several months a year, I really wanted to know what the case was ... and I figured that lots of other people would like to know, too. I got the company to send me a pair, in order to find out. Read More
— Environment

Recycling system developed for old shoes

Of all the things that we regularly dispose of, you would think that shoes would be one of the most difficult to recycle. Not only are well-used shoes kind of ... gross, but they're also made of a variety of different materials, all of which are joined together. Nonetheless, scientists at Loughborough University in the UK announced last week that they have created and trialled "the world’s first comprehensive system for separating and recovering useful materials from old footwear." Read More
— Sports

Nike's Free Hyperfeel shoes use pressure-mapping for minimalist approach

Inspired by Nike’s “Nature Amplified” design ethos, the Free Hyperfeel shoes are the company’s latest sports footwear designed to mimic the working of the human foot. By using pressure-mapping technology and high-speed film to analyze the foot in motion, the designers say they were able to provide padding and protection only where it is needed. The result is a shoe made up of only seven components, which contrasts with the 57 components that go into a typical Air Pegasus running shoe. Read More
— Sports

Adidas Springblade running shoes put a spring in your step

Athletes are always looking for equipment that can give them an edge, and for runners, that means shoes that can launch them ahead with minimal energy. In the past, most shoe companies have produced shoes with flexible mid-soles that help the wearer push off of the ground more easily, but some recent footwear from Adidas might take that concept to a new level. The aptly-named Adidas Springblade uses angled elastic blades on the soles to quickly propel the wearer forward as if they had springs on their feet. Read More
— Good Thinking

Tyvek paper shoes keep things light and airy

Shoe manufacturers have employed all kinds of tactics to cut weight, making shoes that are lighter, quicker and smoother for training, sports and everyday living. Try as they might, there are only so many ounces to be lost when building a piece of gear from foam, rubber and leather. That's why Unbelievable Test Laboratory (UT.LAB) looks to an unconventional material called Tyvek paper in building its barely there Light Wing shoes. Read More