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Food technology

— Health and Wellbeing

AIM device counts chews and takes photos to automatically track your diet

By - November 5, 2014 3 Pictures
There are already a number of devices that allow people to keep track of what and how much they eat, in order to help themselves lose weight or maintain a better-balanced diet. Most of these gadgets, however, rely on the user to manually enter the data regarding each meal. The University of Alabama's Dr. Edward Sazonov is working at taking user error/deceitfulness out of the equation, by developing a headset-style diet-tracking device that automatically monitors what its wearer eats. Read More

Engineer designs the "perfect" ice cream scoop

Ice cream can be very difficult to scoop straight from the freezer. Using traditional scoops in this situation can put a strain on the user's wrist without necessarily being that effective. The Midnight Scoop, however, is designed to protect the user's wrist, whilst making the scooping process easier. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Edible Mist Machine offers a guilt-free flavor hit

By - June 10, 2014 9 Pictures
A moment on the lips, a lifetime on the hips – or so the saying goes. UK-based food inventor Charlie Harry Francis is looking to challenge the idea that the sensory delight offered by our favorite foods need live on in the form of bulging waistbands. He recently launched his Edible Mist Machine that is capable of producing inhalable mists, ranging in flavor from smoked bacon to apple pie. Read More
— Electronics

SCiO is made to analyze ... everything

By - April 29, 2014 4 Pictures
Wondering how nutritious that food is, if that plant needs water, or just what that misplaced pill is? Well, the makers of SCiO claim that their device is able to tell you all of those things, plus a lot more. To use it, you just scan the item in question for one or two seconds, then check the readout on a Bluetooth 4.0-linked smartphone. Read More
— Science

Added DNA could be used to authenticate premium olive oil

By - April 25, 2014 1 Picture
When most people think of counterfeit goods, they probably picture things like handbags or watches. In fact, there's also a huge market for knock-off high-end food products, such as extra-virgin olive oil. Scientists from Switzerland's ETH Zurich research group, however, have come up with a possible method of thwarting the makers of that bogus oil – just add synthetic DNA particles to the real thing. And yes, consumers would proceed to swallow those particles. Read More
— Around The Home

ChocaByte promises 3D chocolate printing for US$99

By - April 3, 2014 2 Pictures
If you’ve been keeping an eye out for a 3D chocolate printer, you probably know that there’s currently not much on the market. Foodini is in its Kickstarter phase and the ChefBot doesn’t print in chocolate. However, the ChocaByte 3D chocolate printer that debuted at this year's CES has since been offered at a special price of US$99 on a limited run of 500 printers, before heading to mass production in its home country of Australia. Read More
— Science

Bursts of light could make plants grown in outer space more nutritious

By - March 5, 2014 1 Picture
There's a conundrum of growing food in outer space: the same optimal conditions that create quick plant growth also leaves them missing a nutrient that protects human eyes from radiation, such as astronauts experience. However, scientists under the direction of Barbara Demmig-Adams at the University of Colorado Boulder have developed a method of using bright pulses of light to trick plants into producing more zeaxanthin, which humans cannot produce on their own but is essential for long-term eye health and visual acuity. Read More
— Military

Three-year pizza to join US Army MRE delicacies

By - February 24, 2014 4 Pictures
Pizza with a three-year shelf life will soon be joining the US Army's field rations menu. These infamous MREs (Meal, Ready to Eat) have a long and checkered history, acquiring such sobriquets over the years as "Meals Rejected by Everyone" and "Materials Resembling Edibles." Pizza has long topped the list of requested meals, but the task of providing a palatable slice of this complex food that will survive the required three-year shelf life has foiled all attempts. Now, the folks at Natick's Combat Feeding Directorate have achieved a minor miracle in food technology: stopping time for a slice of pizza. Read More

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