Advertisement
more top stories »

Food technology


— Around The Home

Open source greenhouse enables smartphone control of a veggie garden

By - November 12, 2014 6 Pictures
Between potting parsley, curating coriander and tending to tomatoes, a vegetable patch requires a fair amount of work and even more know how. But what if you could call on an online community to keep everything in in working order when you hit the limits of your gardening prowess? The MEG Open Source Greenhouse is an internet-connected indoor microclimate designed to tap into the collective knowledge of green-thumbs around the world. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

AIM device counts chews and takes photos to automatically track your diet

By - November 5, 2014 3 Pictures
There are already a number of devices that allow people to keep track of what and how much they eat, in order to help themselves lose weight or maintain a better-balanced diet. Most of these gadgets, however, rely on the user to manually enter the data regarding each meal. The University of Alabama's Dr. Edward Sazonov is working at taking user error/deceitfulness out of the equation, by developing a headset-style diet-tracking device that automatically monitors what its wearer eats. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Edible Mist Machine offers a guilt-free flavor hit

By - June 10, 2014 9 Pictures
A moment on the lips, a lifetime on the hips – or so the saying goes. UK-based food inventor Charlie Harry Francis is looking to challenge the idea that the sensory delight offered by our favorite foods need live on in the form of bulging waistbands. He recently launched his Edible Mist Machine that is capable of producing inhalable mists, ranging in flavor from smoked bacon to apple pie. Read More
— Electronics

SCiO is made to analyze ... everything

By - April 29, 2014 4 Pictures
Wondering how nutritious that food is, if that plant needs water, or just what that misplaced pill is? Well, the makers of SCiO claim that their device is able to tell you all of those things, plus a lot more. To use it, you just scan the item in question for one or two seconds, then check the readout on a Bluetooth 4.0-linked smartphone. Read More
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement