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Font

— Computers

New font designed to help dyslexic people read

By - October 2, 2012 4 Pictures
Developer Abelardo Gonzalez has created an open-source font designed to help people with dyslexia read more easily. Dubbed OpenDyslexic, the font is currently available as a free download, in the form of a Safari and Chrome extension, a bookmarklet, and a free iOS web-browsing app. OpenDyslexic has also been incorporated into several third-party apps, including popular read-it-later service Instapaper. Read More
— Automotive

The creation of a new font – using a Toyota IQ

By - July 22, 2009 18 Pictures
Be of no doubt that the Toyota IQ is a landmark automobile. It may look like another city car, but it's the first genuine luxury super compact and the recently announced relationship with Aston Martin to create bespoke interiors for the vehicle is just the start of a massive push by the world's biggest automobile manufacturer to recalibrate public consciousness on the magnitude of luxury motoring. The creation of the IQ Agility computer font is another step in that process, and a devilishly clever one at that. Watch the video of how it was done and admire the work, not to mention be astonished that the IQ writes better than most humans. Read More
— Good Thinking

Xerox develop MicroText font - 1/100th of an inch high

By - September 14, 2006 3 Pictures
September 15, 2006 Xerox Corporation scientists have developed a digital printing font so tiny that you need a magnifying glass to read it. The new MicroText Specialty Imaging Font, just 1/100th of an inch high, is designed to help make valuable documents with personal information such as birth certificates, personal identification papers, and checks even harder to forge. Microscopic words are already hidden in the design of credit cards, checks and currency as a deterrent to counterfeiting. For instance, the "dots" in the border next to Andrew Jackson's right shoulder on current US$20 bills are really the tiny words "The United States of America 20 USA 20 USA." Now Xerox's innovation carries microprinting to the next level because it can make important documents more secure by individualizing the tiny letters and numbers. Read More

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