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Fluid Dynamics


— Computers

Engineers create a computer with a water droplet processor

By - June 9, 2015 6 Pictures

From driving water wheels to turning turbines, water has been used as the prime mover of machinery and the powerhouse of industry for many centuries. In ancient times, the forces of flowing water were even harnessed to power the first rudimentary clocks. Now, engineers at Stanford University have created the world’s first water-operated computer. Using magnetized particles flowing through a micro-miniature network of channels, the machine runs like clockwork and is claimed to be capable of performing complex logical operations.

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— Science

Bird-inspired pump uses teeth to move water

By - February 4, 2015 1 Picture
In most pumps, either a spinning impeller pulls liquid in and then essentially "throws" it out via centrifugal force, or a rotor draws it through using peristaltic force. After studying how birds' flapping wings use fluid dynamics to push air back while moving the animals forward, however, two scientists from New York University have developed a pump that works in yet another fashion – and it has teeth. Read More
— Space

Lavazza sending first espresso machine into space

By - June 17, 2014 3 Pictures
Living on the International Space Station (ISS) has its drawbacks. For one thing, the morning coffee run to the local espresso shack is the definition of impractical. To make sure that astronauts are suitably caffeinated, Italian coffee company Lavazza is developing the ISSpresso; the first espresso machine built to meet the needs of astronauts who need a decent jolt before facing the day. Read More
— Bicycles

Jaguar teams with Pinarello for Tour de France bike

By - May 29, 2014 10 Pictures
McLaren, Aston Martin, Lamborghini and Ferrari have all done it ... now Jaguar Land Rover has done it, too. The legendary automaker recently joined forces with a major bicycle manufacturer, to create a super high-end bike. In this case, Jag collaborated with Italy's Pinarello to design the new Dogma F8 road bike, which will be used by the Team Sky racing team for the rest of the 2014 season. Read More
— Science

A new understanding of flying snakes may lead to advances in technology

By - March 6, 2014 3 Pictures
So first of all ... yes, flying snakes do exist. Disappointingly, though, they don't have scaly dragon-like wings. Instead, they're able to flatten out their bodies after launching themselves from tree branches, proceeding to glide through the air for up to 100 feet (30.5 m). Recently, scientists figured out why that technique works as well as it does. Their findings could have some major applications for us humans. Read More
— Sports

Redesigned Speedo racing swimsuit ready for 2012 London Olympics

By - July 9, 2012 4 Pictures
A controversy during the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics was Speedo's introduction of its drag reducing LZR Racer swimming outfit. The suit worked so well that it was subsequently outlawed by the Fédération Internationale de Natation (FINA) as the technological equivalent of doping - it gave too large an advantage. Now, with the help of ANSYS simulation software, and just in time for the 2012 London Summer Olympics, Speedo has introduced the Fastskin3 racing system, which offers a new and apparently legal approach to drag reduction during competitive swimming. Read More
— Science

Scientists shake up fluid dynamics of wet dogs

By - November 3, 2010 2 Pictures
What does a labrador and a clothes washer have in common? Not much you might say. Think again. A team of researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, have unlocked the secrets behind how animals such as dogs, mice and even brown bears dry themselves and the key is all in the spin cycle. Much like your household washing machine these animals use resonant frequencies to shed water and given the results of their research, graduate student Andrew Dickerson and his advisor, professor David Hu, are now looking at how they can apply their results. Read More
— Sports

The Trek TTX: Lance Armstrong's Tour de France special designed using computational fluid dynamics

By - July 22, 2005 14 Pictures
UPDATED July 23, 2005 NEW IMAGES With a resting heart-rate of 32 beats per minute and 6.99 victories in the month-long, 3500 kilometre Tour de France cycling race, Lance Armstrong almost qualifies as a Gizmo in his own right. He’s always the one to watch in the event because he has always proven the most competitive in the two stages that are the most distinctive and demanding: the climbing and time trial stages. Armstrong excels when race conditions allow superior talent to shine through. As Armstrong lined up for his final Tour de France, Trek, the company that has supplied his bikes in each of his famous victories, delivered two special machines: the Madone SSLx climbing bike and the TTX time trial machine. Both are lighter, stiffer and faster than anything the company has built before. Read More
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