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Flash

Nova provides more lighting options than the iPhone's built-in flash

Last September, we first heard about Nova – a wireless external flash designed for use with the iPhone. At the time, its creators were raising production funds on Kickstarter. As of today, however, it's available for purchase.  Read More

The Rogue Safari Pop-Up Flash Booster greatly extends the range of a DSLR flash

When you buy a high-end DSLR, it usually includes a device called a hot shoe, which allows you to add all kinds of high-powered flashes. However, for mid-range DSLRs, pop-up flashes are generally installed, which greatly limits the flexibility of the flash. A new device called the Rogue Safari Pop-Up Flash Booster adds a high-powered flash to cameras of this type, greatly increasing the range of the flash.  Read More

Nova is a portable flash made to work the iPhone

Although smartphone cameras are getting better and better, the one place many of them still lack is the flash. Generally, the flash on the iPhone leads to washed-out images with hard shadows. A new product called Nova is designed to fix that. It's a portable flash that wirelessly syncs with an iPhone, and it's small enough to carry in a wallet.  Read More

The iblazr LED flash module for smartphones and tablets

Smartphone cameras are great for capturing that spur of the moment memory, but even with a built-in flash, after-dark snaps can look pretty grim. The iblazr team out of the Ukraine has developed a fully synchronized LED flash module that plugs into the audio jack of a phone or tablet. It's been designed to eliminate the white- or red-eye effect, and packs its own battery so it won't leech from the host device.  Read More

Professor Zenghu Chang with his ultrashort laser pulse apparatus

Since first invented, the effort to make lasers that can produce shorter and more powerful pulses of light has been a very active one. One driving force is that if you want to take a picture of something occurring very rapidly, you need a very short pulse of light to prevent the image from blurring. The first ruby laser produced microsecond pulses of light, but more recently femtosecond optical pulses a billion times shorter have become common. Still shorter pulses belong to the attosecond regime - the regime wherein a University of Central Florida research team is creating optical pulses sufficiently brief to stop quantum mechanics in its tracks.  Read More

The Border Lands start screen will be familiar to anyone who played the real Borderlands

The first Borderlands game was released on PS3, Xbox 360, and PC in 2009 and its cel-shaded visuals and heady mix of RPG and shooter elements resulted in a positive critical reception. A sequel, unsurprisingly titled Borderlands 2, is due to be released on Sept. 18 and the developer, Gearbox Software, is putting the publicity drive in gear. The latest push to gain attention is the release of a 16-bit version of Borderlands playable in a (Flash enabled) web browser. Titled The Border Lands, (like Facebook, it dropped the "the"), it offers some simple "old-skool" fun for gamers while they wait for the main event.  Read More

Browser-based 3D gaming is possible thanks to the Unreal Engine 3 getting Flash support

At the Adobe MAX 2011 conference in Los Angeles this week, Epic Games' CEO Tim Sweeney demonstrated the Unreal Engine 3 running in fully inside Flash as part of his keynote address. The live technical demonstration saw a version of Unreal Tournament 3 running in Adobe Flash Player 11, which was also released this week. Adobe says the development could lead to console-quality 3D graphics in games running directly in the browser, such as Facebook social games.  Read More

Adobe's Flash Media Server 4.5 lets Flash video content be viewed on iOS devices

In April 2010, Steve Jobs’ outlined why Flash would not be permitted on iOS devices in his “Thoughts on Flash” open letter. While Jobs made some valid points in terms of Flash’s proprietary nature, security concerns, and the fact it drains the batteries of mobile devices, the popularity of the Skyfire 2.0 mobile web browser and standalone VideoQ Flash video player showed that there were still plenty of iOS users keen to Flash video on their mobile devices. Now Adobe has finally come to the party with its own solution that will allow Flash video content to be viewed directly within Safari on iOS devices. Because Adobe will use a similar technique to that of Skyfire, users of Android and Playbook mobile devices will also benefit in terms of battery life.  Read More

Skyfire's VideoQ app allows Flash video to be viewed on iOS devices

While a lot of online video has made the move to HTML 5, there are still plenty of Flash videos floating around that leave iDevice users with a “Please Upgrade Flash” message on their displays. With Apple seemingly unlikely to ever support Flash on its iOS devices, Skyfire came to the rescue last year with its Skyfire browser that allows Flash video to be viewed on said devices. Realizing that, despite its lack of Flash support, most people are generally quite happy using Safari, Skyfire has now released a standalone Flash player for iOS devices called VideoQ.  Read More

Skyfire 2.0 for iPhone 'sold out' in just five hours

Looks like the legions of iPhone users are pretty keen to get Flash video on their device with news that Skyfire 2.0 mobile web browser has effectively “sold out.” Within five hours of being released on iTunes, the Skyfire Flash video solution shot to the head of the top grossing app list and third highest paid app overall and overloaded the Skyfire servers, leaving potential buyers staring at the “Please Upgrade Flash” message while the folks at Skyfire Labs scramble to increase capacity.  Read More

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