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Flash memory


— Computers

Intel and Micron announce memory breakthrough

By - July 30, 2015 3 Pictures

If being a processor chip was a human job, it would be one of the most boring. That's because modern processors spend a lot of their time doing not much of anything, as they wait for the slower memory chips to catch up with them. But that may change if Intel Corporation and Micron Technology's new 3D XPoint (3D Crosspoint) technology pans out. Described by the makers as a "major breakthrough in memory process technology," it's the first new class of non-volatile memory to be released since 1989 and is reportedly 1,000 times faster than NAND flash memory.

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— Electronics

3D flash technology moves forward with 10 TB SSDs and the first 48-layer memory cells

By - March 31, 2015 5 Pictures
Flash storage technology will soon see a three-fold improvement in data density thanks to a joint development at Intel and Micron that will allow the production of 3.5 TB flash sticks and 10 TB standard-sized SSDs. Meanwhile, a new 48-layer cell technology development by Toshiba could pave the way for higher write speeds, more reliability and lower costs in solid state drives. Read More
— Space

NASA working to fix Opportunity's memory

By - January 1, 2015 2 Pictures
NASA's Opportunity rover landed on Mars in 2004 and its 90-day mission has now lasted almost 11 years. Unfortunately, its age is beginning to show with the unmanned robotic explorer beginning to display signs of memory loss. Mission control at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory reports that Opportunity's computers have been resetting as its flash memory banks suffer fits of "amnesia," which engineers back on Earth are trying to repair. Read More
— Computers

Samsung moves into mass production of 3D flash memory

By - August 26, 2013 4 Pictures
Samsung has announced production of the first solid state drives (SSD) based on its new 3D V-NAND flash memory. V-NAND flash memories read and write twice as fast as conventional NAND memories, and last 10 times longer while consuming 50 percent less power. At present, the 3D chips offer about the same physical bit density as do more conventional NAND flash memory chips, but while 2D geometries are reaching the end state of their scaling potential, the 3D chips offer as much as two orders of magnitude of additional elbow room for denser devices. Read More
— Electronics

NoteMark pen scanner digitizes paper documents in an instant

By - January 31, 2013 5 Pictures
As more information becomes available in digital formats, it can be a little frustrating to not be able to simply bookmark or save any documents printed on ordinary paper. There are plenty of articles, recipes, letters, contracts, etc. that would be much more convenient if they were saved on a flash drive, which is where the NoteMark would come in handy. With a laser-projected sight and built-in camera that captures documents as high-definition photos, the ballpoint pen/scanner could be an invaluable tool for quickly digitizing and storing paper documents. Read More
— Electronics

Transparent, flexible memory chips could replace flash

By - April 2, 2012 2 Pictures
According to Dr. James M. Tour, a synthetic organic chemist at Houston’s Rice University, flash memory devices can only be built smaller for another six to seven years – at that point, they will reach a technological barrier. Already, however, Tour and his colleagues have developed a new type of memory chip, which they believe could replace flash in thumb drives, smartphones and computers. Not only does their chip allow more data to be stored in a given space, but it can also be folded like paper, withstand temperatures of up to 1,000ºF (538ºC), and is transparent – this means that devices’ screens could also serve as their memory. Read More
— Computers

SanDisk and Toshiba announce 19nm NAND flash memory

By - April 24, 2011 1 Picture
As our use of mobile technology increases, so does our demand for more built-in device storage capacity in smaller and smaller form factors. Only a few weeks have passed since Intel began using its 25 nanometer (nm) NAND flash memory in its 320 series SSD storage solutions and just days since the company joined with Micron Technology to announce the breakthrough 20nm process technology. Now SanDisk and Toshiba have developed and fabricated NAND flash memory modules with 19nm process technology. Read More
— Computers

Intel 510 series SATA 6 Gbps SSDs with 500 MB/s read and 315 MB/s write

By - March 9, 2011 5 Pictures
As solid-state drives (SSDs) continue to drop in price they also continue to improve in performance. A perfect example is Intel's latest SSD 510 Series, which improves upon the company's previous X25-M SSD by adding SATA 6 Gbps performance to take advantage of the higher SATA bus interfaces found on recently introduced 2nd Generation Core processor-based platforms. This allows the 510 Series to boast sequential read speeds of up to 500 MB/s – double that of Intel's current 3 Gbps SSDs – and sequential write speeds of up to 315 MB/s – more than triple that of its current SSDs. Read More
— Music

The album's on the button badge

By - January 3, 2011 4 Pictures
Like many folks, when I was a youngster I used to wear lots of button badges to proudly show what bands I liked. Imagine how cool it would be to allow friends to plug a set of earphones into your badge and let them listen to your favorite bands too. That's exactly what the Playbutton MP3 player will allow you to do. Each device will carry one album's worth of music, have controls on the back to play and skip tracks and adjust EQ, and contain a Li-ion battery for up to five hours of continuous playback. Read More
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