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Fingerprint

— Science

Prototype device detects drug use via fingerprints

By - November 10, 2011 1 Picture
Fingerprints have been used to confirm or determine peoples' identities for over one hundred years now, but new technology is allowing them to be put to another use - drug testing. Intelligent Fingerprinting (a spin-off company affiliated with the UK's University of East Anglia) has just unveiled a prototype portable device that can detect the presence of illicit drugs or other substances in a person's system by analyzing the sweat in their fingerprints. Read More
— Electronics

NEC unveils contactless fingerprint scanner

By - February 25, 2011 1 Picture
Biometric authentication technologies have been around for a while now and, if truth be told, vary considerably from the useless Flash drive at the bottom of my drawer that has only ever recognized my fingerprint once, to something a bit more dependable. NEC has now developed an identification system that is able to register the ridges of a fingerprint and the finger vein characteristics without any sort of physical contact. Read More
— Science

Researchers able to lift fingerprints from clothing

By - February 2, 2011 2 Pictures
Promising early results from research undertaken by the University of Abertay Dundee and the Scottish Police Services Authority could lead to fingerprint evidence being obtained from clothing, for use in criminal prosecution. Refining an existing technique that's been used to successfully recover print detail from smooth objects such as glass and plastic, forensic scientists have managed to create a kind of photo negative of fingerprint impressions on fabric. It's a bit hit and miss at the moment, but even when clear ridge detail isn't retrieved, the technique could still prove useful to investigators looking for other evidence. Read More
— Mobile Technology

Biometric Wallet opens only with a magic touch

By - January 31, 2011 2 Pictures
If you’ve got a lot of money to throw around, what better way to show it than by spending US$825 on the thing that you carry said money around in? That’s the going rate for the Biometric Wallet from Dunhill London. Its tamperproof locking carbon fiber outer shell, leather interior and stainless steel money clip are all nice touches, but what really makes it special – and biometric – is the fact that it will only open with a touch of its owner’s fingerprint. Read More
— Science

Forensic tech would link sex offenders to condoms

By - January 20, 2011 1 Picture
Sexual offenders are increasingly using condoms when committing their assaults, both to reduce the risk of sexually-transmitted diseases, and to avoid leaving their DNA at the crime scene. While an offender might still leave their fingerprints behind, that often only proves that they were at a given location, and not that they were involved in any wrongdoing. Researchers from the Biomedical Research Centre at Sheffield Hallam University, however, have recently developed technology that detects condom lubricant in fingerprints. If a suspect could be tied to a crime scene by their fingerprints, and be shown to have handled a condom at that location – well, they’d have a lot more explaining to do. Read More
— Digital Cameras

HIIDE portable biometric device scans iris, fingers and face

By - May 19, 2010 3 Pictures
It’s billed as “the most powerful tool ever developed for biometric identification,” and it could well be. L-1 Identity Solutions’ HIIDE is a rugged, portable device that can establish and then verify peoples’ identities using three separate biometrics - iris, fingerprint and facial recognition. It must be pretty impressive, as the US Department of Defense recently ordered ten million dollars worth of the suckers. Read More
— Good Thinking

Novel process lifts fingerprints based on geometry, not chemistry

By - May 18, 2010 1 Picture
If shows like CSI have taught us anything about lifting fingerprints, it’s that we do it by dusting them with powder or fuming them with chemicals... and that we have to turn on blue accent lighting and play moody electronic music while we’re doing it. Approaches like these rely on chemical reactions with the deposited finger skin oil to provide the print. A new method developed at Penn State University, however, lets the physical geometry of the print do the talking. The oils are left unaltered, which could make all the difference in a criminal investigation. Read More
— Military

Armatrix SmartGun safety system uses wristwatch to authenticate weapons

By - February 1, 2010 2 Pictures
Stopping weapons from falling into the wrong hands is a major problem for law enforcement agencies all over the world. But if keeping weapons out of the clutches of the criminal element proves too difficult, the next best thing is ensuring that such weapons can’t be used if they do. That’s just what the Armatix SmartGun concept does by disabling the pistol unless it's in the hands of someone wearing a custom wristwatch that sends a signal to arm the gun. Read More
— Computers

Kohjinsha DZ dual-screen laptop released

By - November 30, 2009 7 Pictures
First shown at the CEATEC trade show in October, Kohjinsha's dual screen laptop/netbook is now on sale in Japan. The combination of an ATI Radeon HD3200 graphics processor and an AMD Athlon Neo MV-40 1.6 GHz chip gives the DZ the power to offer independent or combined dual screen action. The first full dual screen laptop to the marketplace also benefits from a 160Gb SATA HDD, an integrated TV card and a multi-touch, gesture sensitive touch pad. Read More
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