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The ÖKO Odyssey six-in-one water bottle/light

Most water drinkers are satisfied if their bottle does its single function – holding water for the occasional sip – effectively. Occasionally, an H20 aficionado is spoiled by two bottle functions, something like a built-in UV purifier or lantern. The new ÖKO Odyssey water bottle, on the other hand, blows bottle expectations up with six functions, including two filters, a flashlight, a lantern and a storage compartment. It's much more than just water.  Read More

In this false-color image, E. coli bacteria (green dots) can be seen trapped around pit me...

In many parts of the world, the presence of harmful bacteria makes it vitally important that water from lakes or rivers be thoroughly filtered before being consumed. While materials such as silver nanoparticles and titanium dioxide will do the job, people in developing nations or rural settings typically need something a lot cheaper and easier to manufacture. As it turns out, wood from pine trees works great.  Read More

The nkd AQUA POD is claimed to replicate water sourced from mountain springs

Companies such as Vapur and Camelbak tout the health and environmental benefits of their water bottles over bottled water. NKD Aqua toes that line but targets the luxury bottled water market by claiming its Pod replicates mountain spring water.  Read More

The Grayl Water Filtration Cup

The Grayl Water Filtration Cup looks like a typical water bottle, but it's actually something quite different: a dual-walled cup that you can use to scoop water, filter out impurities and pathogens that threaten to make you sick, and drink out of, all in seconds. The cup is the latest alternative for filtering out intestine-shredding bacteria and viruses.  Read More

Vapur MicroFilter

Vapur has added a helpful feature to its line of soft, collapsible "Anti Bottles." Not one to get too fancy with names, Vapur calls it the MicroFilter and sells it in a package with its 1-L Eclipse Anti-Bottle. The system provides a light, convenient way of purifying, carrying and drinking water in the wild.  Read More

Associate Professor Darren Sun with some of his Multi-use Titanium Dioxide, prior to its i...

Graphene could soon be facing some competition for the unofficial title of “World’s Most Useful New Substance.” Led by Associate Professor Darren Sun, a team of scientists at Singapore’s Nanyang Technological University have spent the past five years developing a material known as Multi-use Titanium Dioxide. Their research indicates that it can be used to produce hydrogen and clean water from wastewater, double the lifespan of batteries, create antibacterial wound dressings ... and more.  Read More

PureMadi project leaders James Smith and Dr. Rebecca Dillingham

Silver is known for its antibacterial qualities, and has thus found its way into water filters created at institutions such as Stanford and McGill universities. Given that these filters are often used in developing nations, however, it would be nice if they could also contribute to the local economy – instead of being just one more thing that’s brought in from outside. Well, that’s just the idea behind the University of Virginia’s PureMadi filters and MadiDrops.  Read More

A newly-developed device known as a soft x-ray electrostatic precipitator has demonstrated...

Help may be on the way for people with compromised immune systems, severe allergies, or who otherwise have to be wary of airborne nasties. A team of scientists have created something known as a soft x-ray electrostatic precipitator, or an SXC ESP for short. It filters all manner of bacteria, allergens, viruses, and ultrafine particles from the air – plus, it kills everything it catches.  Read More

A German designer named Markus Gerke has detailed a product design concept for Instragram-...

Instaglasses is a new product concept by German designer Markus Gerke. Influenced by Google's Project Glass, Gerke decided to combine the idea of a camera-capable pair of glasses with the various filters of the Instagram photo-sharing mobile app.  Read More

Coffee grounds like these could be used to remove harmful hydrogen sulfide gas from the ai...

Hopefully, you’re not just throwing your used coffee grounds in the garbage ... are you? Not only are they compostable, but they can also be used in robot hands, biofuel engines for cars, warm sports clothing, and as printer ink. Now, it turns out that they have yet another use – a scientist from The City College of New York has discovered that they’re good at soaking up stinky sewer gas.  Read More

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